Fall 2020 Course Atlas

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM COURSE ATLAS

FALL 2020

All students, including majors and non-majors, must take one 200-level Intro (either 270, 271, or 272) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take creative writing workshops, though some professors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors.

Fall 2020 courses that do not require an 200-level introductory class:

ENGCW 354-1 50 Shades: Nonfiction Ethics

ENGCW/THEA 372RW Intermediate Playwriting

ENGCW 385RW; Crosslists: AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

 

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

A 300-level intermediate course is a prerequisite for an advanced course. Students who wish to take an advanced course in fiction, poetry or playwriting in the spring must receive a grade of A or A- in their intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

Permission is required to enroll in all creative writing classes. Students must fill out an application and submit to the Creative Writing Program office via e-mail to Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu. If your application includes a writing sample, the writing sample must be attached to the application and sent as ONE DOCUMENT IN WORD FORMAT. Application forms may also be downloaded from the Creative Writing Program website at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html (see “Quick Links” on the right).

For re-enrollment: Students already accepted into classes do not have to reapply and a new permission number will be sent to them in time for their new enrollment time.

Applications will be accepted until the end of add-drop in the fall.

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

DO NOT E-MAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your e-mail to Paula Vitaris in the Creative Writing Program office, who will then remind you that the proper procedure to apply for a class is to submit your application (and writing sample, if required) at the Program office.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please e-mail Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet pre-registered or added in.

The list of accepted students is posted online at: http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/student-resources/accepted-students.html

Emory College atlas page: https://atlas.emory.edu/

CREATIVE WRITING FALL 2020 COURSE ATLAS

ENGCW 190 Freshman Seminar

ENGCW 190-1 Freshman Seminar: Bodies in the World: Writing the Environment   Yanique    Tues/Thurs 11:20-12:35 (CLASSES WILL BE A COMBINATION OF IN-PERSON AND REMOTE)

Crosslisted with AAS 190.  MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 12; AAS: 3)

NOTE: This is not a permission course and an application is not required.

Content:

About half or more of the class meetings will be online.  Professor Yanique will meet her students in person to start and have a few in-person session to begin with (probably outside) and then workshop on Zoom for the rest of the semester.  

This is a reading and writing class that will serve as introduction to the rigor of college level reading and the vulnerability of college level creative writing, as well as introducing you to your campus—Emory.  Our subject matter of the environment refers to both the outdoors and to human made enclosures. The ‘bodies’ and ‘world’ of the seminar title will explicitly refer to quarantined bodies during a pandemic, to black bodies within a racist society, and to student bodies on a college campus.  Our course will veer into disciplines such as Environmental Studies, African American Studies, Caribbean Studies, English, Creative Writing and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. This class will occur in-person and online. This, as will be true for all aspects of the course, will be subject to change as the course progresses. 

Written Assignments

  • PersonalEssay/Op-Ed Essay (4-6 pages), draft due, final due
  • One short story, group of poems, or novel excerpt (5-25 pages), draft due, final due
  • Smaller assignments due in class, for homework, collected, not collected, etc., as the course progresses

Texts:

Blindness, José Saramago

Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry, Camille Dungy, ed.

Other selected pieces distributed by the professor

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on the elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Most full class meetings will occur via zoom. You may miss one class without excuse or consequence. Missing two classes will result in one half-reduction of your overall grade.

Missing three classes will result in the one full reduction of your overall grade. Missing more than three classes will earn you an F, and removal from the class. This is a seminar class, we all need you to be physically and fully present. Given the reality of this semester, however, if you have pressing reasons to miss class, please do reach out to the professor so you may be accommodated.

Strong participation means not waiting to be called on. Strong participation is not reductive or rooted primarily in personal history. Strong participation focuses on the text at hand and/or the needs of the writer being workshopped. Strong participation is smart without being snarky, is tough without being mean. Basically, be bold, brave and benevolent. 

Extracurricular Activities:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W:  Introduction to Poetry Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students each section

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1  Schiff              Tuesday/Thursday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 271W-2  Christle           Monday/Wednesday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 271W-3  Schiff              Tuesday/Thursday 1-2:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

 

Schiff's sections:

Content:

This lively poetry course will concentrate on form and play in poetry. We will look closely at both the formal attributes and the sense of play in a wide variety of poems across historic periods and in the contemporary moment to discover how the use of poetic forms—and moreover the playful breaking of forms—has shaped poetic expression over time. We will engage a number of traditional forms, as well as free verse, nonce forms, and invented procedures, to ask ourselves how form and structure can be expressive, rebellious, political, and innovative. Students will have the opportunity to imitate and undermine the structures we encounter, and will invent their own as we wonder together how form might be reinvigorated, renovated, recycled, or even abandoned in the present day. Our conversations will inspire exercises and dares that challenge our habits and visions, and we will embrace all kinds of structural possibilities. In addition to  reading widely, we will deeply and generously respond to student work with an eye toward articulating and enhancing the relationships between deep structure and expression. This course will be taught remotely, generally in synchronous settings twice weekly; some directed asynchronous participation, such as peer meetings, will supplement synchronous learning. Requirements include a sense of play, an open mind, and the ability to fully participate in synchronous Zoom sessions.

.

Texts: 

The Art of Description: World into Word, Mark Doty

The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Shorter Fifth Edition, eds. Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter, Jon Stallworthy

Selected Poems, Gwendolyn Brooks

Dear Prudence: New and Selected Poems, David Trinidad

Crawlspace, Nikki Wallschlaeger

Electronic course pack curated by the instructor. Please budget for voluminous printing from Canvas.

Assessment:

20 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship

20 points: Reading preparation

20 points: Poetry exercises

20 points: Midterm portfolio and essay

20 points: Final portfolio and essay

  

Christle's section:

Content:

A workshop introducing some fundamental terms and techniques for the art of writing poetry. You will read three full-length contemporary poetry collections, as well as an abundance of texts (posted to Canvas) including poems, essays, and other materials in order to familiarize yourself with the breadth of possibilities and traditions from which you might draw. Writing assignments will include one new poem each week (accompanied by an audio or video recording of you reading it aloud), ongoing additions to a poet’s notebook, in-class exercises, a creative/craft-based response to one of the assigned books, and a final portfolio, which will include revised poems and an introductory essay. Highly engaged, curious, respectful participation in discussion of classmates’ work, assigned texts, and other conversations is required, in both synchronous and asynchronous settings. In varying forms over the course of the semester you will receive a combination of feedback from both instructor and peers, which you will use as you revise. An openness to experimenting with new forms of reading, writing, and attention will buoy your work.

The course will meet synchronously on Mondays through Zoom. The ability to participate fully in synchronous meetings and in asynchronous components, including audio or video recording (mostly on Canvas) is required. Some activities will require a printer. The use of Microsoft Word is highly recommended.

Texts:

The Carrying, Ada Limon,

Soft Science, Franny Choi

A Fortune for Your Disaster, Hanif Abdurraqib

Assessment:

Your grade will be based on the following:

-Your writing of a new poem each week, sometimes in response to an assigned prompt, sometimes in response to an idea of your own (20%)

-Your participation in discussions of your classmates’ new poems (20%)

-Your participation in discussion of assigned course texts and related activities (20%)

-Your writing of a creative/craft-based responses to one of the assigned books (5%)

-Your weekly additions to your poet’s notebook (5%)

-Your participation in two conferences with the instructor, preferably by phone (5%)

-Your final portfolio of revised poems (20%)

-Your introductory essay to your portfolio, examining and contextualizing your work within the ideas you’ve encountered through the course (5%)

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (five sections) MAX: 15 students each section

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Cooper                         Thursday 6-9 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 272W-2  Houck                          Tuesday 2:40-5:35 (REMOTE)

ENGCW 272W-3  Houck                          Wednesday 2:40-5:35 (REMOTE)

ENGCW 272W-4  Yanique                        Tuesday/Thursday 1-2:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 272W-5  Cooper                         Friday 6-9 p.m. (REMOTE)

  

Cooper's sections:

This class will be taught remotely. Content:This is an introduction to the art of fiction writing for beginning students. The roots of storytelling will be explored, and elements of the fiction writer's craft will be introduced and practiced (desire/conflict, character development, point of view, dialogue, structure, etc.). We will also closely read and examine selected works of published short fiction, though the occasional interdisciplinary model of music, film, and other genres will be considered—all with an eye toward identifying and generating character and story, and learning how to “read like a writer.” In a workshop environment, students will complete writing exercises and shorter pieces of fiction, as well as one longer story and significant revision. They will also be expected to discuss in-depth both the work-in-progress of fellow students and published stories; thusly, class participation is not optional. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should expect some asynchronous meetings in addition to our weekly synchronous meetings. 

Texts:

No texts, but students will be expected to read (and sometimes print) a number of stories posted to Canvas throughout the semester.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

-Writing (50%): shorter pieces of writing; one longer workshop story; one significant revision.

-Participation (50%): oral and written responses to student and published work; story presentations (with partner); class discussion/participation; writing exercises; attendance; overall effort/improvement.

 

Houck's sections:

This class will be taught remotely. An introduction to the philosophy and practice of short literary fiction. Through exercises, discussion, readings and workshops, we will explore the challenges and possibilities of the short form. This class is dedicated to a model of learning-by-doing in which we will practice as writers, editors, and collaborators in a fiction-writing community. A significant portion of the semester will be dedicated to the writing workshop, for which students will be expected to write, submit, and discuss original works of short fiction with their peers.

As an online workshop course, we will interface through Canvas with weekly synchronous meetings on Zoom and asynchronous projects outside of class based on readings and coursework assigned for the semester. Writing workshops like ours are built upon an engaged, diverse, and constructive class community. To meet the challenges of online instruction, workshops will be conducted in small groups, with increased focus on interaction between peer groups and the instructor. All this requires from you is a curiosity about fiction-writing and commitment to your work and that of your peers.

Texts:

Required: The Art and Craft of Fiction, 2nd edition, Michael Kardos

Suggested: Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed.

Readings and handouts from the instructor

Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the semester, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and one (1) story selected for revision. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

*Note: Work in the final portfolio will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and as a draft, rather than as a completed work. Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

 

Yanique's section:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing. We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, narrative control, dialogue, scene development, setting, structure, openings and endings. We will engage with fiction writing as always about creating human beings with histories, bodies, and social realities; as always about creating a world anew for an audience; and always a form of communication with an ongoing humanity—be it dead writers, current beloveds, future anonymous readers or one’s own self. Students will come to understand the fiction workshop as a place to face fears, biases and the limitations of the imagination all via practice and hard work. Students will come to see fiction writing as a place to engage bravely and vulnerably with grief, joy and the full range of human emotions between.

This class will occur online and out & about. Online will mean via Zoom or via Canvas. Out & About refers to times during class when you will be asked to explore specific sites around campus. This, as will be true for all aspects of the course, will be subject to change as the course progresses.

Texts:

Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Telling Tales, Nadine Gordimer, ed.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises
Class Participation
3 pieces of fiction/2 new pieces and one revision (3-20 pgs each)

ENGCW/FILM 354: 50 Shades: Nonfiction Ethics

ENGCW/FILM 354-1 50 Shades: Nonfiction Ethics  Klibanoff  Friday 11:20 a.m.-2:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

Content:

This class will be taught remotely. This course will examine longstanding and evolving ethical standards that confront creators of journalism, documentary filmmaking, nonfiction books (history and memoir), and nonfiction narrative podcast script-writing. (The portion of the course focused on the ethics of documentary filmmaking will be taught by Prof. Matthew Bernstein, chair of the Film and Media Studies Department).The course, which will feature guests, will study existing standards and codes, review real scenarios in which those standards were tested and sometimes failed, and examine how the respective industries responded.

 

NOTE: This class does NOT fulfill the writing requirement. This class is not open to freshmen.

Texts:

Selections from The Ethical Journalist, 2nd ed., Gene Foreman (provided by the instructor)

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on their skill at analyzing, anticipating and discussing/writing about ethical dilemmas across nonfiction platforms; on a team presentation of an historically important ethical controversy in one of those platforms; and on their ability to grasp and apply the meanings and components of ethical standards sufficiently to form solid, defensible judgments in challenging scenarios. The standards that matter in journalism -- clear and clean writing, correct spelling, proper grammar and punctuation -- matter here. Your final grade will be determined as follows: 25 percent each for attendance and participation; the team presentation; writing assignments; and a research paper of 10 pages.

 

Extracurricular Activities:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other remote activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W) Creative Writing workshop.
  • Applications must include a 10-15 page fiction writing sample
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format with writing sample attached to Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other remote activities sponsored by the Program. 

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  Jones                Tuesday 2:40-5:35 (REMOTE)

ENGCW 370RW-2  Corbitt              Friday 11:20-2:15 (REMOTE)

 

Jones' section:

Intermediate Fiction is a workshop/studio style course. Students will produce two complete works of short fiction of 10-15 pages. One of the works of short fiction will be revised significantly and this revised version will serve as the final project in lieu of a final exam. Along with peer critique, students will also read widely in the genre of short fiction, focusing on the basic components of fictions— plot, dialogue, setting, character, etc.

Texts:

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Short Stories Since 1970, 2nd edition, Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds.

Assessment: 

Students will be assessed on their ability to draft and revise short stories, and their critical reading & editing ability demonstrated in workshop. 50% of the final grade will come from the students' original, written pieces (20% for each workshop story; 15% for the final revision of one of them), and 45% from class participation and participation in the literary community (including oral and written responses to published work and other students' writing, class discussion/participation, shorter writing exercises, and attendance. Participation in the literary community included attending readings and submitting written responses.). The final 5% of the grade is the instructor's subjective evaluation of the students' performance and progress, in both class and written assignments.

This class will be conducted online, synchronously.  Students should expect to engage extensively on Canvas as well as in the weekly Zoom sessions.

 

Corbitt's section:

This workshop-based course focuses on strengthening students’ understanding of and confidence with the art and craft of short fiction. Students will produce two original stories for class-wide workshop and revise one, through small group workshop, for the final. Workshop meetings will be synchronous on Fridays, with asynchronous discussion boards on Canvas that will be due most Wednesdays. Students will also study contemporary and foundational short fiction through selected readings, class discussion (synchronous and asynchronous), and a craft review on the contemporary short story collection of their choosing. (A list of options will be provided, but students are not required to select from that list.) Reviews will focus on the collection’s use of a single craft element (such as dialogue, point of view, or description).

Texts:

No required texts

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their participation, writing, revision, and close reading skills. 40% of the final grade will come from students’ original work (10% each for two stories submitted for workshop; 20% for the final revision and explanation). 40% will come from workshop participation (including written responses due before workshop, attendance for Zoom workshops, and contribution to synchronous and asynchronous class discussions). 15% will come from the craft review. 5% will come from attendance at and responses to the Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series.

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W) Creative Writing workshop.
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 3-4 poems, each poem on a separate page.
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format with writing sample attached to Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other remote activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 371RW-1  Brown                       Monday/Wednesday 6:00-7:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 371RW-2  Christle                     Tuesday/Thursday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (REMOTE)

 

Brown's section:

Content:

An opportunity to generate new work while helping to engender in one another new ideas about writing. As there is a profound relationship between reading poetry and writing it, we will read, discuss, and even recite the work of several poets whose example might lead us to a further honing of our craft. In each workshop, we will read and discuss students’ poems in order to examine the relationships between the poet's intentions and ideas and the phrases and images used to embody them. As we explore the genre of poetry in the United States, students will learn the meanings and uses of poetic terms, as well as the work of major American poets. As poetry always has, this course deals with material meant for mature audiences and adult discussion. Students who do not wish to think or study, should reconsider their enrollment in this one.

NOTE: No adds unless you’ve attended the first session, so if you’re on the waiting list and plan to enroll if a space opens up, you must sit in on the first session. Please contact Paula Vitaris (pvitari@emory.edu) for instructions on sitting in on the first session.

Texts:

Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, Michael Dumanis and Cate Marvin, eds.

Contemporary American Poetry, 7th ed., A. Poulin and Michael Waters, eds. NOTE: The 7th edition of Contemporary American Poetry is out of print and will not be available at the Emory University bookstore. Students may purchase used copies online at Barnes and Noble.

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on their writing and critiquing skills though the following expectations:

Essay on personal poetics I: 5%

Invocation (recitation of at least seven lines of a poem): 5%

Presentation/Review: 15%

Presentation Discussion: 20%

Workshop Participation: 20%

Workshop Discussion: 20%

Revisions: 5%

Essay on personal poetics II: 10% 

 

Christle's section:

Content:

An intermediate, intensive workshop in which you will read, discuss, create, revise, and otherwise experience an abundance of poetry. We will seek to notice connections between the language and ideas of poetry and those of the worlds we inhabit. Together we will develop and expand a shared vocabulary in which poems can be made, read, investigated, furthered, and enjoyed. Course materials will include five full-length poetry collections and an assortment of other texts (essays, songs, videos, images, manifestos, notebooks, postcards). This latter collection of texts will be posted to Canvas by the instructor. Additionally, your own and your classmates’ poems will form a crucial portion of your reading over the semester. You will be required to post a new poem each week, including a recording of yourself reading it aloud. In varying forms over the course of the semester you will receive a combination of feedback from both instructor and peers, which you will use as you revise. A portfolio of revised work, including an introduction, will be handed in at the semester’s end. Engaged, curious, respectful participation in discussion of classmates’ work, assigned texts, and other conversations in both synchronous and asynchronous settings is central to the course, as is a sense of being game for trying new ways of reading and writing.

The course will meet synchronously on Thursdays through Zoom. The ability to participate fully in synchronous meetings and in asynchronous components, including audio or video recording (mostly on Canvas) is required. Some activities will require a printer. The use of Microsoft Word is highly recommended.

Texts:

Silk Poems, Jen Bervin

Quilting, Lucille Clifton

Oceanic, Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Voyager, Srikanth Reddy

The Morning of the Poem, James Schuyler

Assessment:

Your grade will be based on the following:

-Your writing of a new poem each week, sometimes in response to an assigned prompt, sometimes in response to an idea of your own (25%)

-Your participation in discussions of your classmates’ new poems (15%)

-Your reading of five books (and other texts) and your discussion of them in class (15%)

-Your writing of craft-based responses to three of those books (15%)

-Your facilitation (with partners) the discussion of one book (5%)

-Your final portfolio of revised poems (20%)

-Your introductory essay to your portfolio, examining and contextualizing your work within the ideas you’ve encountered in the course, including essays on poetics (5%)


ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting

ENGCW 372RW: Playwriting  Two sections

(Crosslisted with THEA 372RW, Playwriting) MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10; THEA: 5) each section

Pre-requisite: None

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR BOTH SECTIONS:

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications are available at the Creative Writing Program office (N209 Callaway) or may be printed out from the “Quicklinks” section on the right-hand side of the Creative Writing “Academics” page (http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html).

Extracurricular Activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend and write short responses about selected remote readings sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, as well as productions by Theater Emory and/or in the greater Atlanta community.

 

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-1 Belflower       Tuesday/Thursday 6-7:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-2 Henritze        Tuesday/Thursday 2:40-3:55 (REMOTE)

 

Belflower’s section:

Content:

This class will be taught remotely. An introduction to the craft and art of playwriting. No previous experience necessary in playwriting or theater. This course will focus on writing exercises, reading and analysis, and creating/ workshopping one-act plays.

Texts:

No required text.

Readings will be made available on Canvas and will consist primarily of a selection of full-length and one-act plays from playwrights such as Annie Baker, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Lynn Nottage, Caryl Churchill, Rajiv Joseph, and Paula Vogel.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their demonstrated understanding of playwriting craft and theatrical process, ability to write with clarity and artistry, and willingness to reflect and implement feedback. Highest grades will be given to students who make extraordinary progress in their playwriting over the course of the semester, approach their analytical assignments with the same rigor and creativity as their writing exercises, and participate generously in giving feedback to other writers. Students who need substantial correction either in the shaping of a play, the meeting of class deadlines, or feedback given to other writers will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who fail to meet substantial class objectives.

 

Henritze's section:

Content:

An introduction to the craft and art of playwriting. This class will be fully remote, with synchronous sessions during the scheduled class times and some remote group work required outside of class times. Students will also meet 1-2-1, virtually, with the professor to discuss ideas, goals and progress. No previous experience necessary in playwriting, acting, or theater. The course will focus on developmental writing exercises and a final project that will allow students to experience first-hand the creative process, from finding inspiration to the fundamentals of playwriting (character, dramatic action, dialogue) to the vital collaboration implicit in preparing a play for production. Expect to write every week and share writing often.

Texts:

Backwards and Forwards, David Ball
Additional reading list chosen from a selection of full-length and short plays from a wide variety of playwrights who demonstrate various approaches to storytelling and dramatic action.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their ability to share writing, format properly, give and receive feedback, and demonstrate in their written assignments an understanding of the topics studied. This online course will rely on virtual meetings. Participation and full attention will be crucial and assessed. Highest grades will be given to writers whose work evolves, who enthusiastically contribute to the process, whose final project needs no major overhaul or shows great progress. Writers who are unwilling to try new approaches, repeatedly miss class, 1-2-1s or deadlines or do not continually practice the skills of creating dramatic action through assignments will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who do not meet substantial class objectives.

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction  MAX: 15 students

Skibell   Monday/Wednesday  6:00-7:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

Content:

This class will be taught remotely. This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing personal nonfiction narratives. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in creating a story out of the events of one’s own life. Students will learn how to turn a true story into a written narrative. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of one another’s works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short nonfiction pieces as well as considerations of technique, creation of real characters, and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as synchronous workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, and short asynchronous lectures, with some in-class writing and improvisation.

Pre-requisite/Writing sample information: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but if you have not taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing, then you must attach a 10-15 page prose writing sample to your application.

Texts:

My Father’s Guitar & Other Imaginary Things, Joseph Skibell

A PDF compendium of stories

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on an 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW/FILM 378RW: Screenwriting

ENGCW 378RW: Screenwriting   

(Crosslisted with FILM 378RW, Screenwriting) MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10; FILM: 5) each section   

Skibell  Tuesday/Thursday 6:00-7:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

This class will be taught remotely. This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing for film. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in writing for the screen. Students will learn the various formats used for film scripts. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short screenplays as well as technical consideration of technique, character development, and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as synchronous workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, and short asynchronous lectures, with some in-class writing and improvisation.

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications are available at the Creative Writing Program office (N209 Callaway) or may be printed out from the “Quicklinks” section on the right-hand side of the Creative Writing Academics page (http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html).

PRE-REQUISITE: Screenwriting applicants must have taken or currently be enrolled in one of these classes:

  • ENGCW 270W Introduction to Creative Writng
  • ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing
  • ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • FILM 270 Introduction to Film

Texts:

Chapters on Course Reserves from Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and The Principles of Screenwriting, Robert McKee

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on an 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each screenplay is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW 385RW/AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

ENGCW 385RW-1: Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases     

(Crosslisted with AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW-1) MAX: 16 (ENGCW: 4; AAS: 4; AMST: 4; HIST: 4)  

Klibanoff        Monday/Wednesday 2:40-3:55 (REMOTE)    

Content:

This class will be taught remotely.

If you previously registered for this course, please note that this fall (2020), the Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases class will depart from its previous plan and from its usual practice of examining unpunished, racially-motivated killings in Georgia from the mid-1940s to 1970. Instead, the class will reach deeper into history and examine deadly, bias-inspired attacks by white people on black people in Georgia from the end of Reconstruction to the dawn of the modern civil rights era. Specifically, we will study that history by examining the lynchings of the 35 black Georgians whose names appear on the Fulton County memorial monument located at the Equal Justice Initiative’s National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama (plus a 36th whose name has not yet been added). Most of the people (26) were killed in the 1906 Atlanta Race Massacre (frequently misnamed a “riot”) during a heated governor’s race in which race-baiting and rumor-mongering by rival newspapers heightened irrational racial hatreds and fears and spurred gruesome attacks. Our task will be to learn as much as we can about these 36 people -- who they were, what they did, how they died, where they are buried -- in the context of the times in which they lived. We will also attempt to locate living descendants. We will seek and use primary evidence through database searches, old newspaper clippings, court records, business records and archives. Student research will be grounded in secondary readings that provide broader context.

NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students. All students, including students from African American Studies, American Studies, and History, must fill out and submit the application form in Word format to Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu (Students who are already accepted do not have to re-apply.)

Texts: 

Rage in the Gate City: The Story of the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot, revised ed., Rebecca Burns

Readings to be posted on Canvas.

Assessment: 

This course primarily emphasizes historical research, macro and micro, that we hope will permit us to learn and animate the lives and times of those who were lynched. All of this will be placed in the context of the history of the time period in which they were killed. The course also provides instruction in narrative writing.

Students, who will work both individually and on teams, will be evaluated on the development and application of their research skills in locating primary evidence and resources. Students will also be evaluated on the clarity of their analysis of the primary evidence against the historical backdrop they find in secondary readings. And they will be evaluated on the development of their narrative writing skills.

There will be frequent writing assignments -- such as building timelines, producing research memos and summaries, and crafting profiles and stories. I will read your work closely, make comments on your theme, your structure, your language, word selection, grammar, punctuation, spelling and citations, as well as your integration of primary evidence and secondary material. You can expect to be asked to revise work. You may work on a team project. You will write your own 8-to-10 page final research paper based on your findings in the cases we’re examining. My goal is not merely for you to learn and understand the history, but to be able to convey it in a clear and compelling narrative style.

I am aware that our access to records may be curtailed by the pandemic, and I will take that into account. Fortunately, online databases that reach deep into history are increasingly plentiful, and you will get training in how to access them. Your final grade will be determined as follows: 25 percent for attendance and participation; 25 percent for showing initiative and persistence in research and in producing outcomes, 25 percent for weekly assignments, and 25 percent for the final research paper.

Finally: This is the first time this course has been taught, at least this way. It is the nature of this kind of work that while some weekly teaching plans can be locked into place, the plan for some classes is based on the previous week’s student findings. So students will be asked to be flexible and nimble in their expectations.  

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend remote readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

Pre-requisite: None

 

ENGCW/FILM 389W Special Topics: Television Writing-CANCELLED

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR FALL 2020 AND RE-SCHEDULED FOR SPRING 2021.

ENGCW 389W: Special Topics: Television Writing

(Crosslisted with FILM 385W) MAX: 14 (ENGCW: 10; FILM: 4)   

Cooper  Monday 2:30-5:30

Content:

This workshop will introduce students to the fundamentals of writing for television. Focusing on half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas, students will learn the format, forms, craft, and culture of television writing. The elements of episodic storytelling will be explored (premise, character, setting, scene structure, episode structure, conflict, dialogue, etc.) Over the course of the semester, students will develop their collaborative and critical skills while exploring their individual creative voices. Students will work together collectively in "writers rooms" to develop detailed pitches for a currently-running television series (including the writing of log-lines, beat sheets, outlines, scenes, and acts). Each student will also write a full "spec script" for an existing series (half-hour or one-hour), as well as develop a treatment for an original series of their own design. Classes will include instruction-based lecture, episode review, individual and collaborative writing exercises, presentations/workshops of both individual and group work, and in-depth discussion. Further areas to be explored include the art and practice of pitching, working in a professional writers' room, dealing with notes, and other aspects of both the creative and business sides of TV writing. Students should expect to collaborate frequently (and creatively) with fellow classmates, in addition to writing their own work. Students will also be expected to participate frequently and meaningfully in class discussion/critiques. (Depending on scheduling, there will be on- and/or off-campus immersive experiences with television production/industry.)

NOTE:

  • Special topics are NOT repeatable; if you took Prof. Cooper's Special Topics class Introduction to Television Writing in Fall 2019, you may not apply for this class.
  • A 10-15 page writing sample is required to be admitted to this course (preferably a teleplay, screenplay, or play). You must submit the writing sample along with your application in WORD FORMAT, in ONE DOCUMENT.
  • This is a permission-only course, and all students, including Film and Media Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program.
  • This course is open ONLY to juniors (third-year) or seniors (fourth-year) students.
  • Students on the waiting list who hope to add this course (if a space opens up) must attend the first session.

Texts/Expenses:

There are no set texts for this course, but please budget for:

  1. A good amount of photocopying/printing
  2. Final Draft software. (No other screenwriting software will be accepted: a deeply-discounted code will be provided to purchase Final Draft on the first day of class).
  3. Laptop (with Final Draft software) should be brought to every class.
  4. Streaming service subscription (Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, etc., TBD based on selected series)

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

50% Writing (including a final spec script, an original treatment, and shorter work).

50% Class participation and attendance (including collaborative work, outside reading series attendance/responses, peer responses, class discussion, class attendance, and overall effort/improvement)

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time. Depending on local production schedules, students might also be required to attend an off-campus production-related activity in the Atlanta area.

Pre-Requisites:

ENGCW/FILM 378RW Screenwriting; or ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction; or ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting.

 

 

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by honors thesis director.

Please review honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html