Fall 2021 Course Atlas

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM COURSE ATLAS

FALL 2021

All students, including majors and non-majors, must take one 200-level Intro (either 271W or 272W) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take creative writing workshops, though some professors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors.

Fall 2021 courses that do not require an 200-level introductory class:

ENGCW/THEA 372RW Intermediate Playwriting

ENGCW 385RW and crosslists AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

A 300-level intermediate course is a prerequisite for advanced courses, which are only offered in the spring semester. Students who wish to take an advanced course in fiction, poetry or playwriting in the spring must receive a grade of A or A- in their intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

Permission is required to enroll in all creative writing classes. Application deadline: May 24, 2021. Students must fill out an application and submit to the Creative Writing Program office via e-mail to Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu. If your application includes a writing sample, the writing sample must be attached to the application and sent as ONE DOCUMENT IN WORD FORMAT. Application forms may also be downloaded from the Creative Writing Program website at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html (see “Quick Links” on the right).

Late applications will be accepted until the end of add-drop in the fall.

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

DO NOT E-MAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your e-mail to the Creative Writing Program administrator, and you will receive a reminder that the proper procedure to apply for a class is to submit your application (and writing sample, if required) to the Program office.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please e-mail Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet pre-registered or added in.

Students will receive an e-mail from Nora Lewis with information about acceptance into classes.

Emory College atlas page: https://atlas.emory.edu/

CREATIVE WRITING FALL 2021 COURSE ATLAS

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W:  Introduction to Poetry Writing (three sections) MAX: 15 students each section

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1  Marshall           Monday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 271W-2  Marshall           Wednesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 271W-3  Staff               Thursday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

 

Marshall's sections:

Content:

Studies in poetry and poetic forms. Readings may vary in individual sections, but all sections emphasize critical reading and writing about poetry and poetics.

This class is an exploration of poetry and her forms. In our time together we will discuss the histories of poetry, try various forms in our own writing, and take a look at the world of contemporary poetry as it functions now. Often, we will ground our discussion in various types of ecologies and systems that impact dominant practices in poetics; these include the climate and social inequity. In addition to reading published works broadly and deeply, we will read one another's writing closely, and through our conversations we will develop a vocabulary with which to name and describe the development of one another's work over time. As well, we'll use that vocabulary to discuss the effects of the choices poets outside of our room have made in their poems. Among the things we can expect of one another in our class: bravery, honesty, and relevance; we will read broadly and from the world outside of campus; complete assigned readings and come to class prepared; we will provide respectful feedback to our peers; we will also listen responsibly and receive feedback gracefully. 

Students should budget for photocopying and printing.

Texts: 

A Poet’s Companion, Kim Addonizio and Dorriane Laux

The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms, Mark Strand and Eavan Boland, eds.

Negotiations, Destiny Birdsong

Register of Illuminated Villages, Tarfia Faizullah

Night Angler, Geffrey Davis

Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry, Camille T. Dungy, ed.

Course packet on Canvas


Assessment:

 

Final portfolios: 50%

Craft essay: 10%

Responses to readings: 10%

Exercises: 10%

Recitations: 10%

Vigorous class participation: 10%


  

Staff's section:

Course atlas description TBA.

 

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students each section

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Haynes                       Monday 2:30-5:30 p.m. (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 272W-2  Houck                         Tuesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 272W-3  Houck                         Wednesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 272W-4  Clark                          Thursday 2:30-5:30 p.m. (ONLINE)

  

Haynes' section:

Content:

This introductory fiction course will focus on foundational craft techniques that include plot and character development, conflict, structure, scene development, and pacing. Through in-class writing assignments, and writing on one’s own, students will develop their fictional voice over the course of the semester. Students will also hone their craft through the analysis, and discussion, of both published stories and classmates’ writing in workshops. A fundamental aspect of this course will be the consideration of one’s life as a source of fiction. As a result, the focus will be on literary fiction; genre fiction, which includes speculative and sci-fi fiction, mystery, horror, romance, or fan fiction will not be written or workshopped. Students will produce two completed pieces of short fiction over the course of the semester. The second story will require significant revision and will be submitted at semester’s end in lieu of final exam. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should budget for photocopying.

 

Texts:

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Stories Since 1970, 2nd ed., Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds.

Selected stories handed out by the professor

 

Assessment:

Story 1 draft/ excellent revision: 25%

Story 2 draft/excellent revision: 25%

Thoughtful written/verbal workshop critique of classmates’ work: 20%

On time workshop submissions: 10%

In class writing/participation: 10%

Class attendance: 5%

Class participation/commenting: 5%
(Excellence is determined by instructor’s subjective evaluation of the students’ various performances during the semester.)

 

Houck's sections:

Content:

An introduction to the philosophy and practice of short literary fiction. Through exercises, discussion, readings and workshops, we will explore the challenges and possibilities of the short form. This class is dedicated to a model of learning-by-doing in which we will practice as writers, editors, and collaborators in a fiction-writing community. A significant portion of the semester will be dedicated to the writing workshop, for which students will be expected to write, submit, and discuss original works of short fiction with their peers. Selected readings will be provided digitally; students should budget for the cost of printing and copying for class.  


Texts:

Required: The Art and Craft of Fiction, 2nd edition, Michael Kardos

Suggested: Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed.

Readings and handouts from the instructor


Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the year, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and one (1) story selected for revision. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

*Note: Work in the final portfolio will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and as a draft, rather than as a completed work. Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

 

Clark's section:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing. This workshop provides you with a place to share your fiction, encounter the creative work of others, and offer and receive constructive criticism; it also serves as a weekly reminder that you are not alone in the sometimes solitary endeavor of writing. We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, dialogue, scene/summary, setting, pacing, and point of view. Fiction allows us to enter into the mind of another human. We will encounter fiction as a place to engage with the full range of human emotions through character-driven stories.

Students will begin by writing creative exercises that explore elements of craft. Students will then progress to writing complete fiction, which will be critiqued in a workshop setting and radically revised. Workshops will focus on authorial intent and help the writer see their story from the outside. Students will come to understand fiction workshop as a place to face fears, listen to others, and push beyond limitations. To become a better writer, reading widely is essential. Students will learn to read with the eyes of a writer, examining the way published stories work and the choices the writers made. Each week, students will read and discuss in-depth one or more published stories.

Note: There will be stories I will ask you to avoid writing (“and in the end, it was all a dream...”). However, this workshop does not wholesale ban genre fiction. Bring your horror, fantasy, fairy tales, and sci-fi, but leave behind the clichés and agreed-upon rules that constrain bad, generic genre writing. The challenge of art is to make new that which has become shopworn and dull. Avoid at all costs repeating the old stuff. Make it new.


Texts:

The Art and Craft of Fiction: A Writer's Guide, 2nd ed., Michael Kardos

Selected stories and craft essays on Canvas

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and critical reading skills. Writing (including exercises, drafts, and a radical revision) will make up 60% of final grades; critical reading skills (shown through reading responses and critiques of student work) and class participation, 40%.

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W) Creative Writing workshop.
  • Applications must include a 10-15 page fiction writing sample
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  Skibell              Monday 2:30-5:30 (ONLINE)

ENGCW 370RW-2  Haynes             Tuesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

 

Skibell's section:

This class will be taught remotely. This workshop will explore the art and craft of fiction writing. We will explore the essential elements of storytelling — character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, scene construction — and how each is used in short fiction. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's work-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short stories as well as technical consideration of technique, character development, and narrative structure, along with two revisions. Classes will be conducted as synchronous workshops/roundtable discussion in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work. 

 

Texts:

Each participant will contribute a published story to the discussion. This will be our text. 

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

 

Haynes' section:

This course requires the rigorous reading, writing, and discussion of fiction by the class cohort. Students will also be required to read and analyze published work. This course builds upon the fundamentals of fiction including conflict development and resolution, character development, plotting, and voice. Students will strengthen their writing through in-class assignments and exercises in preparation for writing, workshopping, and revising, short stories. Students will produce two completed pieces of short fiction over the course of the semester. The second story will require significant revision and will be submitted at semester’s end in lieu of final exam. Students should budget for photocopying.

 

Texts:

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Short Stories Since 1970, 2nd edition, Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds.

A Visit From the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan

Selected stories handed out by the professor

 

Assessment: 

Excellent revision of story 1: 25%

Excellent revision of story 2: 25%

Thoughtful written and verbalized workshop critique of classmates’ work: 20%

Critical reading/analysis skills (demonstrated through discussion and analysis of published work): 10%

Excellence demonstrated in-class assignments: 10%

on-time submission of work: 5%

Attendance: 5%

(Excellence is determined by instructor’s subjective evaluation of the students’ various performances during the semester.)

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W) Creative Writing workshop.
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 3-4 poems, each poem on a separate page.
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

 

Sections:

ENGCW 371RW-1  Sturm                   Monday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 371RW-2  Schiff                    Tuesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

 

Sturm's section:

Content:

This workshop is an opportunity to generate new creative work in a collaborative, critical setting. In order to develop the relationship between creative reading practices and creative writing practices, we will read and discuss books by a number of 20th-century and contemporary American poets whose work will guide our discussion of poetic techniques and aesthetic practices. We will study these poets in order to explore our own interests, intentions, and practices as writers. In particular, we will explore and critique the concept of “other lineages,” of the various micro-traditions and aesthetic affiliations that exist between poets. We will also read and discuss literary history, literary criticism, and aesthetic theory that will inform your development of a working poetics. Students should expect to devote themselves to a practice of reading and writing and be prepared for mature discussions of complex material. We will write new poems in correspondence with the material we read, complete questionnaires to accompany each book, create a poetics statement, and produce digital and/or print chapbooks at the end of the course.

 

Texts:

The Sonnets, Ted Berrigan

Grave of Light, Alice Notley

Feel Trio, Fred Moten

SOS: Poems, 1961-2013, Amiri Baraka

Schizophrene, Bhanu Kapil

The Nonconformist’s Memorial, Susan Howe

Selections of work and essays by other writers will provided as PDFs

 

Assessment:

 

Participation and Discussion: 35%

Questionnaires: 25%

Chapbook: 25%

Poetics Statement: 15%


 

Schiff's section:

Content:

This lively workshop seminar is designed for poets hoping to intensify their craft and creative expression. As we push each other to take our poems further, we will discuss sensibility, facility, vision, and audacity in a range of 20th- and 21st-century poems, moving freely from the discussion of student work into the discussion of major mid-century and contemporary poetics, and back again. We will read more than we write, and wish we had time to read even more, working together to pose some of the questions that have driven poetics over the last half century, as we consider what makes a poem urgent in 2021.  This is a course for poets with experience and ambition who are prepared for a creative semester of hard work, patience, abandon, and awe. Students should budget for printing and photocopying. 

 

Texts:

TBA

 

Asssessment:

30 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship  

25 points: Quizzes on reading 

15 points: Presentation 

15 points: Midterm portfolio and essay 

15 points: Final portfolio and essay 

ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-1: Intermediate Playwriting  Two sections

MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10; THEA: 5) each section

Pre-requisite: None

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR BOTH SECTIONS:

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications may be downloaded from the "Quicklinks" section on the right-hand side of the Creative Writing "Academics" page (http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html) or obtained by e-mailing Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu.

Writing samples are not required for application to ENGCW/THEA 372RW.

Extracurricular Activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend and write short responses about selected remote readings sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, as well as productions by Theater Emory and/or in the greater Atlanta community.

 

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-1 Belflower       Monday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-2 Tabaque       Tuesday  2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

 

Belflower’s section:

Content:

An introduction to the craft and art of playwriting. No previous experience necessary in playwriting or theater. This course will focus on writing exercises, reading and analysis, and creating/ workshopping one-act plays.

 

Texts:

No required text.

Readings will be made available on Canvas and will consist primarily of a selection of full-length and one-act plays from playwrights such as Annie Baker, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Lynn Nottage, Caryl Churchill, Rajiv Joseph, and Paula Vogel.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their demonstrated understanding of playwriting craft and theatrical process, ability to write with clarity and artistry, and willingness to reflect and implement feedback. Highest grades will be given to students who make extraordinary progress in their playwriting over the course of the semester, approach their analytical assignments with the same rigor and creativity as their writing exercises, and participate generously in giving feedback to other writers. Students who need substantial correction either in the shaping of a play, the meeting of class deadlines, or feedback given to other writers will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who fail to meet substantial class objectives.

 

Tabaque's section:

Content:

An introduction to the craft and art of playwriting. No previous experience necessary in playwriting or theater. This course will focus on composition and workshop of original one act plays, reading and analysis, targeted feedback synthesis, and written reflection on the creative process. 

 

Texts:

No required text.

Readings will be made available on Canvas and will consist primarily of a selection of full-length and one-act plays from playwrights such as Lauren Yee, Dominique Morisseau, Qui Nguyen, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Kirk Lynn, Sam Shepard and others.  

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their demonstrated understanding of playwriting craft, ability to write with clarity and artistry, and ability and willingness to give and receive targeted feedback. Highest grades will be given to students who make extraordinary progress in their playwriting over the course of the semester, approach their analytical assignments with the same rigor and creativity as their writing exercises, and participate generously in giving feedback to other writers. Students who need substantial correction either in the shaping of a play, the meeting of class deadlines, or feedback given to other writers will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who fail to meet substantial class objectives.

 

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction  MAX: 15 students

Skibell   Thursday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

Content:

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing personal nonfiction narratives. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in creating a story out of the events of one’s own life. Students will learn how to turn a true story into a written narrative. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of one another’s works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short nonfiction pieces as well as considerations of technique, creation of real characters, and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, and short lectures, with some in-class writing and improvisation.

Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but if you have not taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing, then you must attach a 10-15 page prose writing sample to your application.

 

Texts:

My Father’s Guitar & Other Imaginary Things, Joseph Skibell

A PDF compendium of stories

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

ENGCW/FILM 378RW: Screenwriting

ENGCW 378RW-1/FILM 378RW-2: Screenwriting   

MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10; FILM: 5) each section  

Writing samples are not required for application to ENGCW 378RW-1/FILM 378RW-2.

 

Lucker  Monday/Wednesday 10:00-11:15 (ONLINE)

APPLICATION INFORMATION:

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film and Media Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications may be downloaded from the "Quicklinks" section on the right-hand side of the Creative Writing "Academics" page (http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html) or obtained by e-mailing Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu.

PRE-REQUISITE: Screenwriting applicants must have taken one of these classes:

  • ENGCW 270W Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing
  • ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • FILM 270 Introduction to Film

Welcome to screenwriting! This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing for film. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling --concept, character, plot, setting, structure, scene design, action, dialogue, etc. --and how each is used in writing for the screen. Students will learn the various formats used for film scripts. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's work-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the development and writing of one 30-page screenplay as well as technical consideration of technique, character and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, with also in-class lecture, film clip review, group writing exercises and open discussion. Students should budget for Netflix and Amazon. Course will be held entirely ONLINE. Students must use Canvas and Zoom.

 

Texts:

Crash! Boom! Bang! How to Write Action Movies, Michael Lucker

Elements of Style for Screenwriters, Paul Argentini

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing skills and class participation:


30% Development of screenplay (concept, character, outline).

30% Writing first draft (treatment, presentation, coverage).

30% Delivery of final draft (completed 25 page screenplay).

10% Class participation (attendance, discussion, critiquing).

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

ENGCW 385RW/AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

ENGCW 385RW-1/AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW-1: Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases     

(Crosslisted with AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW-1) MAX: 16 (ENGCW: 4; AAS: 4; AMST: 4; HIST: 4)  

Klibanoff        Tuesday 2:30-5:30 (IN-PERSON)

Content:

In the years between 1945 and 1968, untold numbers of American citizens were targeted for death because of their race, beliefs, or civil rights work – and in some cases merely because of what they drove, how they spoke, or the ever-shifting lines of racial etiquette they crossed. In many cases, their murders were inadequately investigated or prosecuted, their stories left untold, and the crimes against their humanity never punished. The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University is both a class and an ongoing historical and journalistic exploration of the Jim Crow South through the prism of unsolved or unpunished civil rights-era murders in Georgia. Using primary evidence – including FBI records, NAACP files, old newspaper clippings, court transcripts, and personal archives – students come to see and understand history from the inside out. Student essays, grounded in secondary readings that provide broader context, will be aimed at the project website, coldcases.emory.edu. Students also may become engaged in the fourth season of a podcast, Buried Truths, based on a case we’ll be examining in class. 

Students should budget for photocopying.

NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students. All students, including students from African American Studies, American Studies, and History, must fill out and submit the application form in Word format.

 

Texts: 

Course packet handed out in class

 

Assessment: 

There will be frequent writing assignments and frequent requests to revise your work. I will read your work closely, make comments on your theme, your structure, your language, word selection, grammar, punctuation, spelling and citations, as well as your integration of primary evidence and secondary material. You may work on a team project, may be tasked to help with the podcast Buried Truths, and will write an 8- to 10-page final paper. I will build in time for peer review of your work. I will meet with you out of class to focus on both the research and the writing. You will see that I am as serious about your mastery of writing as I am of your command of the historical events we will examine. My goal is not merely for you to learn and understand the history, but to be able to convey it clearly.  

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

 

Pre-requisite: None

 

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by honors thesis director.

Please review honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html