Spring 2020 Course Atlas

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM COURSE ATLAS

SPRING 2020

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 4 p.m., Wednesday, October 23

Late applications will be accepted at any time after the deadline of October 23, but classes fill up quickly and your best chance to get the class you want is to apply by the deadline. This is not a guarantee that you will get the class you want even if you apply by the deadline.

Permission is required to enroll in all creative writing classes. Students must fill out an application and submit to the Creative Writing Program office in N209 Callaway. Application forms are available at the Program office or may be printed out from the Creative Writing Program website at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html (see “Quick Links” on the right).

Applications must be submitted in hardcopy at the Creative Writing Program office (N209 Callaway). E-mail applications are only accepted if you are not on campus this semester (i.e., study abroad, semester off, at Oxford College, etc.) or are mobility impaired. Students meeting those conditions should e-mail their applications to pvitari@emory.edu.

All students, including majors and non-majors, must take one 200-level Intro (either 270, 271, or 272) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take creative writing workshops, though some professors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors. Note that the 300-level workshop in Playwriting does not require any pre-requisite.

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

A 300-level intermediate course is a prerequisite for an advanced course. Students who wish to take an advanced course in fiction, poetry or playwriting in the spring must receive a grade of A or A- in their intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

DO NOT E-MAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your e-mail to Paula Vitaris in the Creative Writing Program office, who will then remind you that the proper procedure to apply for a class is to submit your application (and writing sample, if required) at the Program office.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please e-mail Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet pre-registered or added in.

The list of accepted students is posted online at: http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/student-resources/accepted-students.html

EMORY COLLEGE COURSE ATLAS: https://atlas.emory.edu/

Pre-registration Appointment Schedule: http://college.emory.edu/oue/academic-calendar.htm

ENGCW 190 Freshman Seminar

ENGCW 190-1: Freshman Seminar: News Coverage of Race in America, Past and Present  MAX: 15 students    Klibanoff  Wednesday 2-5

Content:

Students will look at the historical importance and impact of news reporting on civil rights and race in America, and how that coverage in the black and white press, on television and on radio helped frame American attitudes. We will meet at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library to examine primary evidence -- the scrawled notes and typed dispatches of fearless and influential reporters and editors who covered critical events of the civil rights struggle -- to see how America came to understand and misunderstand the racial dynamics around them. While much of the focus will be on reporting and editorial commentary during the modern civil rights movement, we will also follow the historic arc of that coverage to examine and analyze civil rights and race coverage today. Students will read from The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle and the Awakening of a Nation, by Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff, as well as handouts. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Textbook list:

The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation, Gene Roberts, Hank Klibanoff

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their research in the archives of journalists at the Rose Library and other archives (30 percent), on their writing (mid-term paper and a final paper, 50 percent) and their attendance and participation in class (20).

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W:  Introduction to Poetry Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1  Condon           Monday 2-5 p.m.

ENGCW 271W-2  Schiff              Tuesday 2:30-5:30 p.m.

ENGCW 271W-3  Christle           Wednesday 2-5 p.m.

 

Condon's section:

Content:

Writing poetry has the potential to make us more emotionally literate, and inevitably renders our attention to the world more acute. In this creative writing workshop, you will learn essential craft tools and poetic forms that will help you become a more sophisticated poet. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of 20th-century and contemporary poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about our human situations. In-class writing prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive and adult material. Please plan to budget for printing and photocopying.  

Texts: 

A Poetry Handbook, Mary Oliver 

Assessment:

Attendance and informal writing: 10%

Workshop submissions: 15%

Workshop Commentary/Participation: 15%

Craft Analysis: 15%

Essay on Personal Poetics: 15%

Final Portfolio: 30%

Schiff’s section:

Content:

In this lively poetry course we will look closely at the formal attributes of a wide variety of poems across historic periods and in the contemporary moment to discover how the use of poetic forms—and moreover the breaking of forms— has shaped poetic expression over time. We will engage a number of traditional forms, including ballad stanzas, blank verse, couplets, and sonnets, as well as free verse, nonce forms, invented procedures, and chance operations, to ask ourselves how the use of form and structure can be expressive, rebellious, political, and innovative. Students will have the opportunity to imitate and undermine the formal structures we encounter as we ask ourselves how they might be reinvigorated, renovated, recycled, or even abandoned in the present day. Our conversations will inspire exercises and dares that challenge our vision and embrace all kinds of formal possibilities, and during the long weekly workshop component of each class we will deeply and generously respond to student work with an eye toward the relationship between structure and expression.  Requirements include a sense of play and an open mind. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

The Art of Description: World into Word, Mark Doty

The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Shorter Fifth Edition, eds. Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter, Jon Stallworthy

Selected Poems, Gwendolyn Brooks

Dear Prudence: New and Selected Poems, David Trinidad

The New Collected Poems, Marianne Moore; ed. Heather Cass White

Electronic course pack curated by the instructor. Please budget for voluminous printing from Canvas.

Assessment:

30 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship

25 points: Quizzes on reading

15 points: Meter exercise

15 points: Midterm portfolio and essay

15 points: Final portfolio and essay

Christle's section:

Content:

An intensive introductory workshop, in which we will meet to share, discuss, critique, celebrate, explore, and dissect poems by class members and other people. We will seek, in our meetings, to make connections between the language and ideas of poetry and those of the worlds we inhabit. Together we will develop and expand a shared vocabulary in which poems can be made, read, understood, furthered, and enjoyed. A portfolio of revised work, including a brief introduction, will be handed in at the semester’s end. Students should budget for photocopying.

Texts:

Brain Fever, Kimiko Hahn

Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, Ross Gay

IRL, Tommy Pico

Homage to the Lame Wolf, Vasko Popa

Trances of the Blast, Mary Ruefle

Assessment: 

-Your writing of a new poem each week, sometimes in response to an assigned prompt, sometimes in response to an idea of your own

-Your participation in discussions of your classmates’ new poems

-Your reading of several books (and other texts) and your discussion of them in class

-Your writing of thoughtful, detailed responses to three of those books

-Your revising of poems with as you approach the assembly of a portfolio at the semester’s end

-Your writing of an introductory essay to your portfolio, examining and contextualizing your work within the ideas you’ve encountered in the course

ENGCW 272 Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272: Introduction to Fiction Writing  MAX: 15 students

Cooper Monday 2-5

NOTE: This class does not fulfill the post-freshman writing requirement.

Content:

This is an introduction to the art of fiction writing for beginning students. The roots of storytelling will be explored, and elements of the fiction writer's craft will be introduced and practiced (desire/conflict, character development, point of view, dialogue, scene-construction, structure, etc.). We will also read and examine selected works of published short fiction, though the occasional interdisciplinary model of music, film, and other genres will be considered—all with an eye toward identifying and generating character and story, and learning how to “read like a writer.” For the workshop environment, students will write shorter pieces of fiction, as well as one longer story and revision. They will also be expected to discuss in-depth the work-in-progress of fellow students; class participation is not optional. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should budget for significant printing and photocopying.

Students might be required to meet with the professor and demonstrate proficiency in English in order to gain admittance to the class. This course is not recommended for students who are less than fluent in spoken and written English.

Texts:

No texts, but students will be expected to print and read several selections posted to Canvas throughout the semester.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

-Writing (50%): shorter pieces of writing; one longer workshop story; one significant revision.

-Participation (50%): oral and written responses to student and published work; class discussion/participation; writing exercises; attendance; overall effort/improvement.

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

Pre-requisite: None

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Jones                        Tuesday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 272W-2  Unigwe                     Wednesday 2-5

ENGCW 272W-3  Houck                       Thursday 2:30-5:30 p.m. 

 

Jones' section:

Content:

This course introduces students to short fiction, as both readers, writers, and editors of the same. The course is built around the fundamental elements of literary fiction, including plot, character, voice, dialogue, and setting. Students will write a number of short pieces, many derived from prompts and exercises. There pieces will serve as preparation for writing, and revising, a story draft. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should budget for photocopying.

Students might be required to meet with the professor and demonstrate proficiency in English in order to gain admittance to the class. This course is not recommended for students who are less than fluent in spoken and written English.

Texts:

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed., Lex Williford, ed.
What If? Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers, Anne Bernays, Pamela Painter, eds.

Assessment:

Writing (including exercises, drafts and polished work) will make up 60% of final grades; critical reading/analysis skills (demonstrated through reading responses and critiques of student work), 20%; class participation, 20%.

 

Unigwe’s section:

Content:

To be a writer, one must first be a reader. In this class, we will learn to improve our craft by reading like writers, asking relevant questions as we read: how do the narrative choices writers make influence and advance plot?  What role does dialogue play in character development? What makes a compelling first chapter? How do we maintain tension and create a narrative arc that sustains plot? How do we find (and develop) our voice? How do we create characters that readers care about? We will also be writing extensively, putting the lessons we are learning to practice.

Format

This is a workshop designed to create/encourage a community of writers while focusing on the writing needs of individual students. Discussions are based on the students’ own works as well as selected fiction (novellas and short stories chosen with a view to expanding the discussion on the different elements of fiction). Students will have written assignments as well as in class writing exercises prompted by an aspect of the work being studied. Every week, we will discuss selected stories by students. All stories must be printed out and stapled. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, 10th ed., Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French

Handouts from the instructor

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on constructive class participation (contribution to workshops and attendance) and written assignments. Class participation is 40 % of the total grade while writing will make up 60%.

Houck's section:

Content:

An introduction to the philosophy and practice of short literary fiction. Through exercises, discussion, readings and workshops, we will explore the challenges and possibilities of the short form. This class is dedicated to a model of learning-by-doing in which we will practice as writers, editors, and collaborators in a fiction-writing community. A significant portion of the semester will be dedicated to the writing workshop, for which students will be expected to write, submit, and discuss original works of short fiction with their peers. Selected readings will be provided digitally; students should budget for the cost of printing and copying for class.    

Texts: 

Required:

The Art and Craft of Fiction, 2nd Edition, Michael Kardos

Recommended:

Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed.

Readings and handouts from the instructor

Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the year, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and one (1) story selected for revision. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

*Note: Work in the final portfolio will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and as a draft, rather than as a completed work. Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

ENGCW/FILM 354 50 Shades of Grey: Nonfiction Ethics

ENGCW/FILM 354-1 50 Shades of Gray: Nonfiction Ethics MAX: 15 students (ENGCW-10/FILM-5)

Klibanoff  Wednesday 2-5 p.m.

Content:

This course will examine longstanding and evolving ethical standards that confront creators of journalism, documentary filmmaking, nonfiction books (history and memoir), and nonfiction narrative podcast script-writing. (The portion of the course focused on the ethics of documentary filmmaking will be taught by Prof. Matthew Bernstein, chair of the Film and Media Studies Department). The course, which will feature guests, will study existing standards and codes, review real scenarios in which those standards were tested and sometimes failed, and examine how the respective industries responded. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

NOTE: This class does NOT fulfill the writing requirement. This class is not open to freshmen.

Texts:

The Ethical Journalist, 2nd ed., Gene Foreman

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on their skill at analyzing, anticipating and discussing/writing about ethical dilemmas across nonfiction platforms; on a team presentation of an historically important ethical controversy in one of those platforms; and on their ability to grasp and apply the meanings and components of ethical standards sufficiently to form solid, defensible judgments in challenging scenarios. The standards that matter in journalism -- clear and clean writing, correct spelling, proper grammar and punctuation -- matter here. Your final grade will be determined as follows: 20 percent each for attendance and participation; the team presentation; the mid-term research paper; writing assignments and the take-home final.

Extracurricular Activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction (three sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION FOR THIS COURSE: The pre-requisite is any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but you must provide a prose writing sample of 10-15 pages attached to your application if:

  • You have not taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • You are not a Creative Writing major
  • English is a second language

ALL WRITING SAMPLES MUST BE SINGLE-SIDED. DOUBLE-SIDED WRITING SAMPLES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  Jones               Monday 2-5

ENGCW 370RW-2  Cooper             Tuesday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 370RW-3  Yanique           Thursday 10:30-1:30

 

Jones' section:


Intermediate Fiction is a workshop/studio style course. Students will produce two complete works of short fiction of 10-15. One of the works of short fiction will be revised significantly and this revised version will serve as the final project in lieu of a final exam. Along with peer critique, students will also read widely in the genre of short fiction, focusing on the basic components of fictions— plot, dialogue, setting, character, etc. Students should budget for photocopying.

Texts:

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Short Stories Since 1970, 2nd Edition, Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their ability to draft and revise short stories, and their critical reading & editing ability demonstrated in workshop. 60% of the final grade will come from the students' original, written pieces (25% for each workshop story; 15% for the final revision of one of them), and 30% from class participation and participation in the literary community (including oral and written responses to published work and other students' writing, class discussion/participation, shorter writing exercises, and attendance. Participation in the literary community included attending readings and submitting written responses.). The final 5% of the grade is the instructor's subjective evaluation of the students' performance and progress, in both class and written assignments.

Cooper's section:

Content:

This workshop is designed to build upon the experience and skills students have already acquired in previous fiction workshops. Students in this class will be expected to push themselves consistently to hone their storytelling skills, (primarily in the form of short fiction, although other relevant genres will be explored). Students will also be expected to push themselves to engage with the gamut of human emotions and experiences—through both their own writing and the work of fellow students and published writers. We will plumb the roots of storytelling and practice the various elements of craft (character, point of view, dialogue, setting, scene-building, structure, etc.), with students producing two strong, original pieces of short fiction, one of which will be revised significantly and submitted at semester's end in lieu of a final exam. Also required: detailed, thoughtful written and oral feedback on fellow student writing in workshop, as well as reading of and responses to published work. Class participation is not optional. Students should budget for a significant amount of printing and photocopying.

Texts:

No texts, but students will be expected to print and read several selections posted to Canvas throughout the semester.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

-Writing (50%): two original workshop stories; one significant revision.

-Participation (50%): oral and written responses to student and published work; class discussion/participation; shorter writing exercises; attendance; overall effort/improvement.

Yanique's section:

Content:

This is an intermediate fiction writing seminar of close reading of published professional work, and workshop style critique of student reading.  This course is not merely an obligatory step between intro and advanced.  This course is a exploratory craft course built around particular areas of focus.  In this case, the areas of focus are process and structure. This is a course on the art of writing scene and a course on writing the environment—particularly as we consider how the space around a character makes both plot and an inner life possible.  This is also course on the structure and architecture of stories themselves—we will examine how fiction is built, how it holds together and how it can fall apart.  We will explore the spaces we have come from and find ourselves in now, in order to gain a greater understanding of how to put the people we create into their own spaces in real and fantastic ways.  Students will be expected to revise their own fiction continuously over the course of the class.  Students will be expected to create their own cannon of master fiction writers and articulate their place in their traditions.

You may miss one class without excuse or consequence. Missing two classes will result in one full reduction of your overall grade. Missing more than two classes will earn you an F, and removal from the class.

Please note that class participation and attendance includes attending and engaging in colloquia and public readings assigned throughout the semester. 

All interested students must be present for the first class meeting or will forfeit their acceptance to the course.

Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

Claire of the Sea Light, Edwidge Danticat

Selected stories handed out by the professor

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on six elements of the course, as listed below.  Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally. This is an intermediate course and will be graded accordingly. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale.  Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale.  Students performing below this level will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations. Excellence is defined by the professor.  

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises 
Class Participation 
Personal Anthology
3 pieces of fiction

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW-1: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry (Two sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION FOR THIS COURSE: The pre-requisite is any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but you must provide a writing sample of 3-4 poems (each poem on a separate page) attached to your application if:

  • You have not taken ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing
  • You are not a Creative Writing major
  • English is a second language

ALL WRITING SAMPLES MUST BE SINGLE-SIDED. DOUBLE-SIDED WRITING SAMPLES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 371RW-1  Christle             Tuesday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 371RW-2  Schiff                Thursday 2:30-5:30

 

Christle's section:

Content:

An intermediate, intensive workshop in which you will read, discuss, create, revise, and otherwise experience an abundance of poetry. We will seek, in our meetings, to make connections between the language and ideas of poetry and those of the worlds we inhabit. Together we will develop and expand a shared vocabulary in which poems can be made, read, understood, furthered, and enjoyed. We will read not only five poetry collections, but essays on poetics, and you will be asked to begin considering what informs your own. A portfolio of revised work, including a brief introduction, will be handed in at the semester’s end. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

Fourth Person Singular, Nuar Alsadir 

Space Struck, Paige Lewis

When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities, Chen Chen

Silk Poems, Jen Bervin

Calamities, Renee Gladman

Assessment:

You will be assessed on the following:

-Your writing of a new poem each week, sometimes in response to an assigned prompt, sometimes in response to an idea of your own

-Your participation in discussions of your classmates’ new poems

-Your reading of several books (and other texts) and your discussion of them in class

-Your writing of thoughtful, detailed responses to three of those books

-Your facilitation (with partners) the discussion of one book

-Your revising of poems with as you approach the assembly of a portfolio at the semester’s end

-Your writing of an introductory essay to your portfolio, examining and contextualizing your work within the ideas you’ve encountered in the course, including essays on poetics.

 

Schiff’s section:

Content:

This lively workshop seminar is designed for poets hoping to intensify their craft and creative expression. As we push each other to take our poems further, we will discuss sensibility, facility, vision, and audacity in a range of 20th- and 21st-century poems, moving freely from the discussion of student work into the discussion of major mid-century and contemporary masters, and back again. We will read more than we write, and wish we had time to read even more, working together to pose some of the questions that have driven poetics over the last half century, as we consider what makes a poem urgent in 2020.  This is a course for poets with experience and ambition who are prepared for a creative semester of hard work, patience, abandon, and awe. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

To be determined, along with electronic course pack curated by the instructor. Please budget for voluminous printing from Canvas.

Assessment:

30 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship

25 points: Quizzes on reading

15 points: Presentation

15 points: Midterm portfolio and essay

15 points: Final portfolio and essay

ENGCW 373RW Advanced Fiction

ENGCW 373RW: Advanced Fiction  Two sections MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 373RW-1  Grimsley       Monday 2-5

ENGCW 373RW-2  Yanique        Tuesday 10:30-1:30

 

Grimsley’s section:

Content:

An intensive workshop in the writing of fiction. Students will write 3-4 short stories of 2000-4000 words during the course of the semester. Students will receive feedback on the work through the workshop process, and through meetings with the instructor. The seminar will focus on completion of a number of pieces of fiction so that each writer in the workshop will end the semester with a beginning body of work, if such was not present before. The design of this workshop presumes that the writer has written before and has at least one completed story. The workshop will focus as much as possible on motivating each writer to complete as much work as possible, within the limits of the time. Students should budget for photocopying.

Pre-requisite: ENGCW 370RW, Intermediate Fiction

Texts:

No texts

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their ability to write clearly and with proper grammar, the shaping of narrative prose, and the logic and artistry of their story choices. Highest grades will be given to writers whose work is without need of major overhaul or who make extraordinary progress in their writing over the course of the semester. Writers who need substantial correction either in the use of language, the shaping of a story, the logic of a story, or the meeting of class deadlines will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who fail to meet substantial class objectives.

Yanique's section:

Content:

This is an intensive seminar at the advanced level. This class is for students who have decided to commit themselves to the craft of fiction writing. The ideal student has written a number of stories or chapters of a novel, which have achieved a level of polish and of which the student feels proud.

Students will be required to hand in in a polished story as application to the class. Admitted students will enter a course designed around their particular craft needs based on the application materials.  For example, if the majority of students are struggling with dialogue our class will focus heavily on the craft of dialogue. In most cases our class will have two focai, in order to address the needs of all students. Texts for this course will be determined by the course topic(s).

The course will involve close reading of professional published work, as well as workshop style critique of student work. Students will be required to meet one-on-one with the professor for an extensive consultation at least once during the semester.

You may miss one class without excuse or consequence. Missing two classes will result in one full reduction of your overall grade. Missing more than two classes will earn you an F, and removal from the class. 

Please note that class participation and attendance includes attending and engaging in colloquia and public readings assigned throughout the semester. 

Students seeking to be admitted to this course are required to hand in a writing sample of 2-6 pages with application to this course. (WRITING SAMPLES MUST BE SINGLE-SIDED.) All interested students must be present for the first class meeting or will forfeit their acceptance to the course. 

Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Texts:

TBA

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. This is an advanced course and will be graded accordingly.  Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing below this level will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations. Excellence is defined by the professor. 

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises 
Class Participation 
2 full pieces of fiction or 1 new piece and one revision (3-20 pgs each)
 

 

ENGCW 374RW Advanced Poetry

ENGCW 374RW-1: Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry  MAX: 15 students

Brown  Tuesday 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Content:

In this course, we will discuss student poems in a workshop environment while examining contemporary poetry collections and several essays that can provide models for exercises and for new work. As there is a profound relationship between reading poetry and writing it, we will read, discuss, and even recite the work of several poets whose example might lead us to a further honing of our craft. In each workshop, we will read and discuss students’ poems in order to examine the relationships between the poet's intentions and ideas and the phrases and images used to embody them. As poetry always has, this course deals with material meant for mature audiences and adult discussion. Students who do not wish to think or study, should reconsider their enrollment in this one. Ten poems are due in the final portfolio. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Students MUST attend the first class session or they will not be permitted to take the class.

NOTE: Students who have not taken ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry with Professor Brown must include 3-4 poems with their application. Each poem must be on its on separate page.

Pre-requisite: ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry.

Texts:

TBA

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on their writing and critiquing skills through the following expectations:

Essay on personal poetics I: 5%

Invocation (recitation of at least seven lines of a poem): 5%

Presentation/Review I: 5%

Presentation/Review II: 10%

Presentation Discussion: 20%

Workshop Participation: 20%

Workshop Discussion: 20%

Revisions: 5%

Essay on personal poetics II: 10%

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW/THEA 375RW Advanced Playwriting

ENGCW/THEA 375W: Creative Writing: Advanced Playwriting

Grimsley  Tuesday 2:30-5:30

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 10/THEA: 5)

Content:

An intensive workshop in the writing of plays for the live stage for advanced students. The class will focus on the writing of a play, either a long one-act play or a full-length work. The class will include techniques for the analysis of the writing process while the work is in progress, as well as techniques for the critique of rough drafts, setting of clear goals for revision and the polish and rewriting of the work. Craft exercises will be minimal and students will be expected to come to the first session of the workshop with a play begun. You will be required to see three new plays during the semester. Regular meetings with the instructor will be required as well. Students should budget for photocopying.

Note: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications are available at the Creative Writing Program office (N209 Callaway) or may be downloaded from the Creative Writing webpage at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html (click on the course application Quick Link at the right hand side of the page). Applications must be submitted in hardcopy at the Creative Writing Program office. Students who are not on campus this semester or are mobility-impaired may e-mail applications to pvitari@emory.edu or fax to 404-727-4672.

Pre-requisite: ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting

Texts:

Plays: I, Katori Hall

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tom Stoppard

How I Learned to Drive, Paula Vogel

Two Plays by Edward Albee (The American Dream and The Zoo Story), Edward Albee

Wit, Margaret Edson

Promenade and Other Plays, Maria Irene Fornes

The Empty Space, Peter Brook

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and critical understanding of dramatic writing. Writing (including exercises and final portfolio) will comprise 65% of final grades; critical understanding (evaluated through classroom conversation, textual critiques, and course participation), 35%.

Extracurricular Activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and play readings sponsored by the Playwriting Center of Theater Emory outside of class time, and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction MAX: 15 students

Skibell Tuesday  2:30-5:30 p.m. 

Content:

Introduction to the fundamentals of writing personal nonfiction narratives. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in creating a story out of the events of one’s own life. Students will learn how to turn a true story into a written narrative. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of one another's works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short nonfiction pieces as well as considerations of technique, creation of real characters, and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, with some in-class writing and improvisation. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

NOTE: Pre-requisite is any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but if you have not taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing, then you must attach a 10-15 page prose writing sample to your application.

Texts:

My Father’s Guitar & Other Imaginary Things, Joseph Skibell

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on an 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’swriting and critical reading skills.

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW/FILM 379RW Advanced Screenwriting

ENGCW/FILM 379W: Creative Writing: Advanced Screenwriting

Skibell  Monday 2-5

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 10/FILM: 5)

Content:

This workshop will focus on the creation of an hour-long screenplay. We will explore beyond the basics of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in an advanced way in writing for the screen. Students should know the various formats used for film scripts. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of one another's works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation and development of a single long screenplay. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, with some in-class writing and improvisation. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications are available at the Creative Writing Program office (N209 Callaway) or may be printed out from the “Quicklinks” section on the right-hand side of the Creative Writing Academics page (http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/index.html).

Pre-requisite: ENGCW/FILM 378RW Screenwriting or ENGCW 379W/FILM 389 Special Topics: Introduction to TV Writing

Texts:

Chapters on Course Reserves from Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and The Principles of Screenwriting, Robert McKee

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on an 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. The student’s screenplay is worth 29 points, the final table-reading (with actors) is worth 29 points, and proof of attendance at a Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

 

ENGCW 495RW Honors

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by honors thesis director.

Please review honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html