Spring 2021 Course Atlas

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM COURSE ATLAS

SPRING 2021

Applications are now being accepted for Spring 2021 Creative Writing workshops.

Permission is required to enroll in all creative writing classes. Students must fill out an application and submit to the Creative Writing Program office in N209 Callaway. Application forms are available at the Program office or may be printed out from the Creative Writing Program website at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html (see “Quick Links” on the right).

Applications must be submitted via e-mail to the department administrator, Paula Vitaris, at pvitari@emory.edu. The application must be in Word format. If a writing sample is required, the sample must be attached to the application form and submitted together as ONE document in Word format.

All students, including majors and non-majors, must take one 200-level Intro (either 270, 271, or 272) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take creative writing workshops, though some professors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors. Note that the 300-level workshop in Playwriting does not require any pre-requisite.

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

OXFORD STUDENTS: Oxford students may apply for an ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing workshop, as that course is not taught at Oxford in Spring 2021. Oxford students who have completed a required 200-level introductory-level course may apply for Emory 300-level intermediate workshops.

A 300-level intermediate course is a prerequisite for an advanced course. Students who wish to take an advanced course in fiction, poetry or playwriting in the spring must receive a grade of A or A- in their intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

DO NOT E-MAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your e-mail to Paula Vitaris in the Creative Writing Program office, who will then remind you that the proper procedure to apply for a class is to submit your application (and writing sample, if required) at the Program office.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please e-mail Paula Vitaris at pvitari@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet pre-registered or added in.

The list of accepted students will be posted online at: http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/student-resources/accepted-students.html

EMORY COLLEGE COURSE ATLAS: https://atlas.emory.edu/

Pre-registration Appointment Schedule: http://college.emory.edu/oue/academic-calendar.htm

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W:  Introduction to Poetry Writing (three sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1  Christle          Monday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (Monday synchronous; additional 75 minutes asynchronous) (REMOTE)

ENGCW 271W-2  Pence             Wednesday 6:00-9:00 p.m. (REMOTE)

 

Christle's section

Content:

A workshop introducing some fundamental terms and techniques for the art of writing poetry. You will read three full-length contemporary poetry collections, as well as an abundance of texts (posted to Canvas) including poems, essays, and other materials in order to familiarize yourself with the breadth of possibilities and traditions from which you might draw. Writing assignments will include one new poem each week (accompanied by an audio or video recording of you reading it aloud), ongoing additions to a poet’s notebook, in-class exercises, a creative/craft-based response to one of the assigned books, and a final portfolio, which will include revised poems and an introductory essay. Highly engaged, curious, respectful participation in discussion of classmates’ work, assigned texts, and other conversations is required, in both synchronous and asynchronous settings. In varying forms over the course of the semester you will receive a combination of feedback from both instructor and peers, which you will use as you revise. An openness to experimenting with new forms of reading, writing, and attention will buoy your work.

The course will meet synchronously on Mondays through Zoom. Students will work an additional 75 minutes asynchronously per week. The ability to participate fully in synchronous meetings and in asynchronous components, including audio or video recording (mostly on Canvas) is required. Some activities will require a printer. The use of Microsoft Word is highly recommended.

 

Texts:  

The Carrying, Ada Limon

Quilting, Lucille Clifton

Oceanic, Aimee Nezhukumatathil

 

Assessment:

Your grade will be calculated based on the following elements:

-Your writing and posting of a new poem each week along with a recording of you reading the poem aloud (15%)

-The quality and quantity of your participation in Canvas discussions of your classmates’ new poems (15%)

-Your preparation for and participation in synchronous course components, including Zoom meetings, phone conferences, and Creative Writing events (15%)

-Your writing of a creative/craft-based response to one of the assigned books (10%)

-Your weekly additions to your poet’s notebook (5%)

-Your final portfolio of revised poems (30%)

-Your introductory essay to your portfolio (10%)


Pence’s section:

Content:

This course is designed to help you learn many writing techniques as well as the discipline of writing literary poems. While this is a poetry writing workshop, where we consider and discuss poems that you write and submit to the class, we will also study the craft of writing poetry, delve into a few works from the canon, then focus on more established contemporary poems and collections. For this class, students will produce original poems in response to readings and writing prompts designed to challenge the writer's own conventions and habits. Please remain open-minded about the work you read; many poems will have adult themes.

Class meetings will be arranged thematically and will always include a workshop of selected student poems. We will also read and review three recent poetry collections and write flash reviews. Our workshop requires sensitivity and general kindness as well as clear and focused feedback to help all students improve their work. You are required to respond to each week’s selection of writing prompts with a poem and submit your poems online by Sunday noon. For Wednesday’s class, read all assigned readings, including all poems, and provide written commentary on each workshop poem by class time. At the end of the course, you will turn in a final portfolio of poems you’ve written during the course that reflects careful revision based on student and instructor remarks as well as a poet’s statement about your preoccupations, your progress, your intent, and your influences. You will also write three critical reviews (2 pages each) of three volumes of poetry throughout the term.

Texts:

A Poet's Companion, Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux

Soft Science, Franny Choi

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin, Terrance Hayes

Four-Legged Girl, Diane Suess

 

Assessment:

Original poems (turned in by deadline) & written peer feedback: 20% (workshop days)

Flash Reviews: 10% each

Attendance, preparedness, and participation: 10%

Final portfolios: 40%

--all versions of poems with featured poems carefully revised based on feedback from workshops

--a poet’s statement

ENGCW 272 Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272: Introduction to Fiction Writing  MAX: 15 students

Cooper Friday 6:00-9:00 p.m. (REMOTE)

NOTE: This class does not fulfill the post-freshman writing requirement. Students whose first language is not English must submit a prose writing sample of 10-15 pages, attached to the application as one WORD document.

Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or they will not be permitted to take the class.

Content:

This is an introduction to the art of fiction writing for beginning students. The roots of storytelling will be explored, and elements of the fiction writer's craft will be introduced and practiced (desire/conflict, character development, point of view, dialogue, showing vs. telling, structure, etc.). We will also closely read and examine selected works of published short fiction, though the occasional interdisciplinary model of music, film, and other mediums will be considered—all with an eye toward identifying and generating character and story, and learning how to “read like a writer.” Students will complete writing exercises and shorter pieces of fiction, as well as one longer story that will be workshopped. Students will also be expected to analyze and discuss in-depth both the work-in-progress of fellow students and published stories; thusly, class participation is not optional. (Note: we will center character-based literary fiction, meaning this course is not one in which genres like fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, horror, romance, etc. will be read or written.) This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should expect asynchronous work in addition to our synchronous meetings.

 

Texts:

No texts, but students will be expected to print and read a number of selections and stories posted to Canvas throughout the semester.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

  • Writing (50%): shorter pieces of writing; one longer workshop story; significant revision of workshop story.
  • Participation (50%): oral and written responses to student and published work; presentations; class discussion/participation; shorter writing assignments; attendance; overall effort/improvement.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

Pre-requisite: None

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (three sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Yanique                    Monday/Wednesday 11:20-12:35 (IN-PERSON)

ENGCW 272W-2  Corbitt                      Tuesday 1:00-3:55 (REMOTE)

ENGCW 272W-3  Gonzales                   Friday 11:20-2:15 (REMOTE)

 

Yanique's section:

Content:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing. We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, narrative control, dialogue, scene development, setting, structure, openings and endings. We will engage with fiction writing as always about creating human beings with histories, bodies, and social realities; as always about creating a world anew for an audience; and always a form of communication with an ongoing humanity—be it dead writers, current beloveds, future anonymous readers or one’s own self. Students will come to understand the fiction workshop as a place to face fears, biases and the limitations of the imagination all via practice and hard work. Students will come to see fiction writing as a place to engage bravely and vulnerably with grief, joy and the full range of human emotions between.

Note:  Students interested in the course must attend the first class meeting.  No students who miss the first class meeting will be allowed entry into the course. 

 

Texts:

Annie John, Jamaica Kincaid

Telling Tales, Nadine Gordimer, ed.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises
Class Participation
3 pieces of fiction/2 new pieces and one revision (3-20 pgs each)


Corbitt’s section:

Content:

This course introduces students to the craft and study of short fiction through a process-focused approach to workshop. The semester will begin with short writing exercises from which students will identify, construct, and revise full stories. These revised drafts and a reflection on process will serve as the final exam in this course. Throughout the semester, students will develop a creative practice through idea blogs and writing prompts. Students will also read and discuss published stories with an emphasis on fundamental craft elements, such as plot, character, dialogue, and description. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction.

 

Texts:

No required text. Readings will be provided on Canvas.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and close reading skills. Workshop participation (including written responses and in-class discussion) will account for 40% of the grade. Creative work (including prompt responses, reading responses, exercises, and drafts) will account for 40%, and the final revised story and explanation will make up the remaining 20% of the grade.

 

Gonzales' section:

Content:

This introduction to creative writing will be taught from a social justice perspective. Students will learn the elements of craft by analyzing modern fiction from various writers of color while writing their own short stories. In addition to discussions of craft we will investigate the role of fiction in illuminating social justice issues and inspiring change. Students will participate in workshops, respond to writing prompts, and provide weekly feedback to their peers. Students will also be required to view online literary events and write short response pieces. Students might be required to meet remotely with the professor and demonstrate proficiency in English in order to gain admittance to the class. This course is not recommended for students who are less than fluent in spoken and written English.

 

Texts:

Flash Fiction Latino: Short-Short Stories for The United States and Latin America, Robert Shapard, James Thomas and Tay Gonzalez, eds.

Drinking Coffee Elsewhere, ZZ Packer

 

Assessment:

Attendance 20%, Original Stories 20%, Peer Feedback 15%, Literary Responses 10%, Classroom Engagement 15%, Final Portfolio 20%

 

 

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction (two sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION FOR THIS COURSE: The pre-requisite is any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, but you must provide a prose writing sample of 10-15 pages attached to your application if:

  • You have not taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing or
  • You are not a Creative Writing major or
  • English is a second language

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  Cooper             Thursday 6:00-9:00 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 370RW-2  Houck              Monday 1:00-3:55 p.m. (REMOTE)

 

Cooper's section:

Content:

This workshop is designed to build upon the experience and skills students have acquired in previous fiction workshops. Students taking this class will be expected to push themselves consistently to develop and hone their storytelling skills, and to engage with the gamut of human emotions and experiences—through both their own writing and the work of others (including published writers and fellow students). We will plumb the roots of storytelling and practice the various elements of craft (character, point of view, dialogue, setting, scene-building, structure, etc.), with students producing two strong, original pieces of short fiction, one of which will be revised significantly and submitted at semester's end (to serve as a final exam). Also required: detailed, thoughtful written and oral feedback on fellow student writing in workshop, as well as reading of and responses to published work. Class participation is not optional. (Note: we will center character-based literary fiction, meaning this course is not one in which genres like fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, horror, romance, etc. will be read or written.) Students should expect asynchronous work in addition to our synchronous meetings.

NOTE: Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or they will not be permitted to take the class.

Texts:

No texts, but students will be expected to print and read a number of selections and stories posted to Canvas throughout the semester.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and class participation:

  • Writing (50%): two original workshop stories; one significant revision.
  • Participation (50%): oral and written responses to student and published work; class discussion/participation; shorter writing assignments; attendance; overall effort/improvement.

 

Houck's section:

Content:

Intermediate Fiction Writing is a workshop studio course focused on the craft and development of short, literary fiction. Students will read short stories published by a diverse set of innovative contemporary authors, and be asked to produce at least two original stories for peer review and assessment. Other coursework includes short exercises and craft-focused analysis. We will pay specific attention to issues of process, craft, and story-structure during the semester, experimenting with modes of non-linear and fragmented narrative. Students are expected to be present and engaged in class discussion, to incorporate acquired skills and concepts into their writing, and to participate an active literary community of their peers.



Texts:

Required:

One (1) edition of The Best American Short Stories anthology – specific editions will be individually assigned to students after the initial class; students will purchase their specific edition (ranging between 2005 and 2020, respectively) and read it asynchronously during the semester.

- Readings and handouts from the instructor

Non-required/Supporting texts:

The Half-Known World: On Writing Fiction, Robert Boswell

Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed.

The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers, John Gardner

Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft and Form, Madison Smart Bell

Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction (Expanded Edition), Charles Baxter

The Elements of Style, 3rd ed., William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White



Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the year, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and selected revisions. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

*Note: Work in the final portfolio will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and as a draft, rather than as a completed work.

Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

 

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW-1: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry Christle Thursday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (Monday synchronous; additional 75 minutes asynchronous) (REMOTE)

MAX: 15 students

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION FOR THIS COURSE: If you have not taken ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing with Professor Christle, then you must provide a 3-4 poem writing sample (each poem on its own page), attached to the application as one WORD document.

 

Content:

An intermediate, intensive workshop in which you will read, discuss, create, revise, and otherwise experience an abundance of poetry. We will seek to notice connections between the language and ideas of poetry and those of the worlds we inhabit. Together we will develop and expand a shared vocabulary in which poems can be made, read, investigated, furthered, and enjoyed. Course materials will include five full-length poetry collections and an assortment of other texts (essays, songs, videos, images, manifestos, notebooks, postcards). This latter collection of texts will be posted to Canvas by the instructor. Additionally, your own and your classmates’ poems will form a crucial portion of your reading over the semester. You will be required to post a new poem each week, including a recording of yourself reading it aloud. In varying forms over the course of the semester you will receive a combination of feedback from both instructor and peers, which you will use as you revise. A portfolio of revised work, including an introduction, will be handed in at the semester’s end. Engaged, curious, respectful participation in discussion of classmates’ work, assigned texts, and other conversations in both synchronous and asynchronous settings is central to the course, as is a sense of being game for trying new ways of reading and writing.

The course will meet synchronously on Thursdays through Zoom. Students will work an additional 75 minutes asynchronously per week. The ability to participate fully in synchronous meetings and in asynchronous components, including audio or video recording (mostly on Canvas) is required. Some activities will require a printer. The use of Microsoft Word is highly recommended.

 

Texts:

Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry, John Murillo

Engine Empire, Cathy Park Hong

Silk Poems, Jen Bervin

The Morning of the Poem, James Schuyler

Voyager, Srikanth Reddy

 

Assessment:

Your grade will be calculated based on the following elements:

-Your writing and posting of a new poem each week along with a recording of you reading the poem aloud (15%)

-The quality and quantity of your participation in Canvas discussions of your classmates’ new poems (15%)

-Your preparation for and participation in synchronous course components, including Zoom meetings, phone conferences, and Creative Writing events (15%)

-Your writing of a creative/craft-based response to two of the assigned books (15%)

-Your final portfolio of revised poems (30%)

-Your introductory essay to your portfolio (10%)

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW 373RW Advanced Fiction

ENGCW 373RW: Advanced Fiction  Two sections MAX: 15 students (each section)

Pre-requisite: ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 373RW-1  Gonzales      Tuesday 2:40-5:35 p.m. (REMOTE)

ENGCW 373RW-2  Skibell    Tuesday/Thursday 6:00-7:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

 

Gonzales' section:

Content:

Required: Writing sample of 5 pages minimum of recent fiction (double-spaced) attached to the application and submitted to pvitari@emory.edu as one WORD document.

In this advanced workshop, students will write 3-5 chapters of a work of longer fiction (novella/novel) while also providing weekly feedback to their peers. Students are expected to already have a strong grasp of many writerly techniques including characterization, dialogue, and voice. In addition to expanding these craft tools, this class will have a special focus on deepening students' understanding of story structure, world-building, and resonance. Each student will also present one detailed diagram of a novel of their own choosing.

 

Texts:

No texts.

 

Assessment:

Attendance 20%, Original Fiction 20%, Peer Feedback 15%, Diagram Presentation 10%, Classroom Engagement 15%, Final Portfolio 20%

 

Skibell's section:

Note: Writing sample not required.

Content:

An intensive seminar in the writing and critiquing of original short fiction. For students who have had regular fiction writing seminars or equivalent experience (in most cases, fiction written on your own, or in other academic settings). Aside from a working knowledge of fiction, the most important requirements for the class are a willingness to take risks with your fiction, and desire to be part of an atmosphere in which both the work and the writer are taken seriously. The class will focus on student work, with special emphasis on the skills needed to move from orginal draft to completed story. Participants will read a wide range of work by established writers, lead seminar discussions of classmates' work, and complete craft-specific exercises. The workshop design presumes that participants have written fiction before, and are familiar with the basic elements of craft.

 

Texts:

40 Short Stories: A Portable Anthology, Beverly Lawn

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and critical reading skills. 65% of the grade will come from the students’ written work (25% for the first two assignments and 15% for the final assignment) and 25% from class participation (discussions, reading, written critiques of classmates¹ work). The final 10% of the grade is the instructor’s subjective evaluation of the student’s performance, in class and on paper.


 

 

ENGCW 374RW Advanced Poetry

ENGCW 374RW-1: Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry  MAX: 15 students

Brown  Tuesday 6:00-9:00 p.m. REMOTE

Pre-requisite: ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry.

NOTE: If you have not taken ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry with Professor Brown, then you must provide a 3-4 poem writing sample (each poem on its own page), attached to the application as one Word document.

Content:

In this course, we will discuss student poems in a workshop environment while examining contemporary poetry collections and several essays that can provide models for exercises and for new work. As there is a profound relationship between reading poetry and writing it, we will read, discuss, and even recite the work of several poets whose example might lead us to a further honing of our craft. In each workshop, we will read and discuss students’ poems in order to examine the relationships between the poet's intentions and ideas and the phrases and images used to embody them. As poetry always has, this course deals with material meant for mature audiences and adult discussion. Students who do not wish to think or study, should reconsider their enrollment in this one. Ten poems are due in the final portfolio. Students should budget for printing and photocopying.

Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or they will not be permitted to take the class.

 

Texts:

Muscular Music, Terrance Hayes 

Wind in A Box, Terrance Hayes

Good Woman, Lucille Clifton

Amerikan Kontemporary Poetry, John Murillo


Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on their writing and critiquing skills through the following expectations:

Essay on personal poetics I: 5%

Invocation (recitation of at least seven lines of a poem): 5%

Presentation/Review I: 5%

Presentation/Review II: 10%

Presentation Discussion: 20%

Workshop Participation: 20%

Workshop Discussion: 20%

Revisions: 5%

Essay on personal poetics II: 10%

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW/THEA 375RW Advanced Playwriting

ENGCW/THEA 375W: Creative Writing: Advanced Playwriting

Skibell  Tuesday/Thursday  6:00-7:15 p.m. REMOTE

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 10/THEA: 5)

Pre-requisite: ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting

Content:

In a round-table setting, students will workshop their own work, critique their fellows' work, and delve into the art of playwriting and dramatic narrative, while reading and acting in each other's scenes, and reading published work. Writing and reading intensive.

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program.  Click here to download an application: Application

 

Texts:

Plays from the Contemporary American Theater, Brooks McNamara

Nine Plays of the Modern Theater, Harold Clurman, ed.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and critical understanding of dramatic writing. Writing (including exercises and final portfolio) will comprise 65% of final grades; critical understanding (evaluated through classroom conversation, textual critiques, and course participation), 35%.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and play readings sponsored by the Playwriting Center of Theater Emory outside of class time, and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction MAX: 15 students

Klibanoff Tuesday  2:40-5:35 p.m. REMOTE

Content:

This workshop is focused on long form, nonfiction magazine and feature writing -- reading it, reporting it, writing it, and doing so in ways and by means that separate the exceptional from the pedestrian. This is nonfiction. Be prepared to be a reporter, to meet people face-to-face, to ask questions, to see and hear things with your own eyes and ears. We’ll have visiting experts on hand as we discuss where great ideas come from, how to be strategic in your reporting, the art of the interview, and crafting stories, then stories within stories. We're looking mostly at print, but we will see beyond the dead tree media at the growing opportunities for magazine-style writing and long-form narratives online. Ultimately, the goal of the course is for you to become a considerably wiser and more effective nonfiction story-teller, for which the basis is sound reporting. Students should budget for photocopying.

NOTE:

  • Students must have taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing or they must provide some evidence they have done journalistic writing and attach a writing sample of 10-15 pages of prose or journalistic writing to their application as one Word document.
  • This course is not open to first-year students.

Texts:

Storycraft: The Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfiction, Jack Hart


Assessment:

This course in magazine and feature writing requires students to report, report and report (which means interviewing people, conducting research, observing people, situations) and to write complete stories in a narrative, journalistic style that meets high standards for clarity, accuracy, story-telling and ethics. Students will be assessed primarily on their engagement in effective, ethical reporting (gathering of information) for magazine and feature stories, and on the overall development of their reporting skills; on the development of their narrative writing as they seek the ultimate goal: to produce publishable work; on class participation, and on the quality of their responses to assignments.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW 389/FILM 385 Special Topics: Journalism in the Movies

ENGCW 389-1: Special Topics: Journalism in the Movies   Klibanoff   Tuesday/Thursday 11:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m. (REMOTE) Crosslisted with FILM 385

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 10/FILM: 5)

Note: This class does not count towards the post-freshman writing requirement.

Content:

If Journalism has historically been considered a pure and ethically-driven form of non-fiction; if, pardon the cliché, it is the first rough draft of history; if its principle motivator in this nation’s history has been the pursuit of truth, justice and the American way (you did know Superman/Clark Kent was a newspaper reporter, right?); and if it is the most zealous guardian of not just any amendment to the U.S. Constitution but the First Amendment, then why is the profession of journalism historically misrepresented as crude and corrupt when Hollywood tries to tell its story? Or is the profession’s purity just an old former newspaperman’s misguided fantasy that confuses vice and virtue in a vocation that consumed him and his conscience for more than 35 years? Newsrooms have long been filled with quiet creative geniuses and loudmouth miscreants, the brilliant and the boorish, the talented and the tawdry, and yet there are few if any professions as tethered to, and as cognizant of, a code of ethics. What does that get you? Good fodder for screenwriters and filmmakers of feature films and documentaries at home and abroad. We’ll dive into this history and have some lively assignments and discussions.  

This course will be taught remotely, twice a week in 75-minute classes. The class will be capped at 15 students. Highest priority will be given to students in their final semester.  

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program.  Click here to download an application: Application

 

Texts:

The films represent the primary text in the course, and there will be additional handouts as well. As much as possible, the films will be made available for your streaming through the Library Course Reserves, though you may have to tap some other streaming services on occasion. When there is a cost associated with the streaming, you will be responsible for that; if this poses a hardship, please let me know. For reasons of safety from the coronavirus, there will not be screenings where we all view a film together; each student will be responsible for viewing all the assigned films on their own.  

 

Assessment:

Students will be expected to view and take notes on every film; to attend all classes, to read all the handouts, to respond conscientiously and comprehensively to all written assignments, and to participate actively in discussions. There may be a team assignment that revolves around writing scenes that portray journalism ethical standards, or the breach of them, in a film script based on news coverage during the semester. The final paper will likely be a reflection on all you’ve learned during the semester.  

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW 389W/FILM/THEA 385W Special Topics: Introduction to Dramatic Writing

ENGCW 389W-1: Special Topics: Introduction to Dramatic Writing  Ra  Tuesday/Thursday 1:00-2:15 p.m. (REMOTE)

Crosslisted with FILM/THEA 385W

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 5/FILM: 5/THEA: 5)

Content:

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: An Expedition into Storytelling

A good story has drama. From a movie to a play to even your favorite Tik Tok video, something about the structure makes you want to keep watching. You find yourself wondering, "What will happen next?" This course will teach students what dramatic structure is and how it works. We will practice crafting stories for each other using tools like realistic dialogue, fully realized characters, and strong endings. These tools are useful beyond creative writing. We all love a good story whether we're on stage or not. By the end of this course, students will have experienced writing across disciplines like poetry, theater, and film.

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film and Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program.  Click here to download an application: Application

 

Texts:

No textbooks.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing and critical understanding of dramatic writing. Writing (including exercises and final portfolio) will comprise 65% of final grades; critical understanding (evaluated through classroom conversation, textual critiques, and course participation), 35%.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW 495RW Honors

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by honors thesis director.

Please review honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html