Fall 2022 Course Atlas

CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM COURSE ATLAS

FALL 2022

All students must take one 200-level Introduction class at Oxford College or Emory (270W, 271W, or 272W) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take Creative Writing workshops, though some instructors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors.

Fall 2022 courses that do not require a 200-level introductory class:

  • ENGCW/THEA 372RW Intermediate Playwriting
  • ENGCW 385RW and crosslists AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

A 300-level Intermediate course is a pre-requisite for Advanced courses, which are usually offered in the Spring semester. Students who wish to take an Advanced course in fiction, poetry, or playwriting must receive a grade of A or A- in their Intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

Permission is required to enroll in all Creative Writing classes. Students must fill out an application and submit to the Creative Writing Program office via email to Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu. If your application includes a writing sample, it must be attached to the application and sent as ONE DOCUMENT IN WORD FORMAT. Your email subject line must include "application" -- failure to use this keyword may result in a delayed response.

Application forms may be downloaded from the Creative Writing Program website at https://creativewriting.emory.edu/academics/Course%20Application.html or email nora.lewis@emory.edu to request a copy.

 

Applications will be accepted until the end of Add/Drop/Swap in the Fall (or until classes are full/closed).

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

 

DO NOT EMAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your email to the Creative Writing Program administrator, and you will receive a reminder that the proper procedure to apply for a class is to submit your application (and writing sample, if required) to Nora Lewis.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please email Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet registered or been added in.

Students will receive an email from Nora Lewis with information about acceptance into classes.

Emory College atlas page: https://atlas.emory.edu/

 

CREATIVE WRITING FALL 2022 COURSE ATLAS

ENGCW 190 Freshman Seminar

ENGCW 190-1: Freshman Seminar: Writing in the Garden     MAX: 15 students    GER: FSEM

Christle   Tuesday   2:30-5:30

NO APPLICATION REQUIRED

Content:

The title of this course names both what we'll study (texts involving gardens) and what we will do ourselves. We will often gather outside, and course requirements will include an hour of work each month in Emory’s Educational Gardens. (No prior experience is necessary, and the nature of the work will be adaptable/accessible to all.) We will additionally attend events during Jamaica Kincaid’s visit to campus, and make excursions beyond our classroom to explore gardens and their histories. Throughout, you will collect language and compose observations drawn from your reading and experiences in an informal notebook, which you will make use of when completing writing assignments. These assignments will periodically be shared and discussed in class, and you will be expected to offer each other insightful, generative feedback. You will also receive feedback in two individual conferences with Prof. Christle. This feedback will assist you in revising two assignments.

 

Texts:

Course texts will include My Garden (Book) by Jamaica Kincaid, Ours by Cole Swensen, and Gardens in the Dunes by Leslie Marmon Silko, as well as selected poems, essays, and stories provided as links or PDFs on Canvas.  

 

Assessment:

  • Notebook: 15%  
  • Gardening hours: 15%  
  • Event attendance: 10%  
  • Writing assignments: 25%  
  • Participation and attendance: 20%  
  • Revised writing assignments: 15%  

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W: Introduction to Poetry Writing (three sections) MAX: 15 students each section

 

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1     Sturm       Monday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 271W-2     Schiff        Tuesday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 271W-3     Schiff        Wednesday 2:30-5:30 

 

Sturm's section:

This class is an opportunity to generate new creative work in a collaborative, critical setting. In order to develop the relationship between creative reading practices and creative writing practices, we will read and discuss books by a number of 20th and 21st century poets whose work will guide our discussion of poetic techniques and aesthetic practices. We will study these poets in order to study our own interests, intentions, and practices as writers. In particular, we will explore and critique the concept of “other lineages,” of the various micro-traditions and aesthetic affiliations that exist between poets. Students should expect to devote themselves to a practice of reading and writing and be prepared for mature discussions of complex material. We will write new poems in correspondence with the material we read, complete questionnaires to accompany each book, recite poems, engage with poets’ archival materials in Emory’s Rose Library, create a poetics statement, and produce chapbooks of our own poetry.

 

Texts:

A Thousand Times You Lose Your Treasure, Hoa Nguyen (Wave Books, 2021)

ISBN 9781950268177

 

How to Wash a Heart, Bhanu Kapil (Liverpool University Press, 2020)

ISBN 9781789621686

 

The Sonnets, Ted Berrigan (Penguin Books, 2000)

ISBN 9780140589276

 

Provided as PDFs: selections from the work of Amiri Baraka, Jack Spicer, Federico Garcia Lorca, George Oppen, Alice Notley, James Schuyler, and others

 

Assessment:

Students’ grades will be based on timely and attentive completion of the following exercises:

Poem-Responses: 20 points each (200 total)                        

Workshop Participation & Discussion: 100 points               

Chapbook with revisions: 100 points

 

Extracurricular Activities: Students will be required to attend one class in the Rose Library, located on the 10th floor of Woodruff Library.


  

Schiff's sections:

Content:

This lively poetry course will concentrate on form and play in poetry. We will look closely at both the formal attributes and the sense of play in a wide variety of poems across historic periods and in the contemporary moment to discover how the use of poetic forms—and moreover the playful breaking of forms—has shaped poetic expression over time. We will engage a number of traditional forms, as well as free verse, nonce forms, and invented procedures, to ask ourselves how form and structure can be expressive, rebellious, political, and innovative. Students will have the opportunity to imitate and undermine the structures we encounter as we wonder together how form might be reinvigorated, renovated, recycled, or even abandoned in the present day. Our conversations will inspire exercises and dares that challenge our habits and visions, and we will embrace all kinds of structural possibilities. In addition to  reading widely, we will deeply and generously respond to student work with an eye toward articulating and enhancing the relationships between deep structure and expression. Requirements include a sense of play and an open mind.

 

Books:

The Art of Description: World into Word, by Mark Doty

Selected Poems, by Gwendolyn Brooks

Dear Prudence, New and Selected Poems, by David Trinidad

frank: sonnets, by Diane Seuss

 

Electronic course pack curated by the instructor. Please budget for voluminous printing from Canvas.

 

Grade Calculation:

30 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship

30 points: Quizzes on reading

20 points: Midterm portfolio and essay

20 points: Final portfolio and essay

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students each section

 

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Ngugi                      Monday 8-11am 

ENGCW 272W-2  Sathian                   Tuesday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 272W-3  Sathian                   Wednesday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 272W-4  Yanique                   Thursday 2:30-5:30

  

Ngugi's section  

Content:

In this class we will focus on learning what makes a good short story, and how to analyze short stories and write them. To accomplish this, we'll break down the creative act into things we can discuss. Any complex action is only understandable if you can break it down into smaller segments. Classes cover a wide range of subjects including character, dialogue, plot, point of view, and more. During the semester, we’ll be doing a lot of writing – both in class and out – and a good amount of reading. As a key component to any beginning writer’s life is the workshop, we’ll spend a lot of time discussing and critiquing your writing; we’ll also use our time this semester to read published works, tackle writing exercises, and talk about the craft of writing. Please note that reading, writing, and thoughtful critiquing take a lot of time and effort. I write that because I don't want anyone to think that good writing is easy or "natural"; it's hard work to get everything to work out. If you do, however, dedicate your energies to this course, it can be a vastly rewarding experience.

 

Assessment/Grading Rubric:

To excel in this class, students must complete all assignments -- there are quite a few -- and participate in good faith.

  • Attend all classes except in extenuating circumstances, participate in discussions, and write conscientiously during writing prompt sessions. 
  • Do all the readings by published authors and their classmates, providing written feedback regularly.
  • Participation includes attending all departmental reading events and one office hours appointment.
  • Write two pieces of short fiction of up to 20 pages, one of which students will revise during the course, as well as several shorter writing assignments.

 

Texts:

  • Weekly readings and handouts from the instructor
  • Instructor will assign and distribute published stories

 

Non-required text 

  • The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers, John Gardner, Vintage Books 1991
  • Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction, Charles Baxter, Graywolf Press 2008.

 

These texts will serve as a writing resource outside the classroom.

 

Sathian's Tuesday section:

The Real and the Unreal

A man wakes up as a giant bug. A woman marries an ogre. A nose earns a promotion, landing a great government job. Eerie wallpaper comes to life.

In fiction, anything can happen, including these seemingly ‘unreal’ events. But what is reality? When we write fiction, how much should the material world constrain us? When does hewing to the everyday world—a world concerned with relationships, money, death, race—help us create richer fiction? When does departing from the strict rules of this world—adding vampires, zombies, ghosts, and metamorphoses; subtracting death, gender, even time—make for a more textured, even more real literary experience?

In this class, we will consider some great ‘unreal’ writers from Franz Kafka and Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Carmen Maria Machado and Charles Yu, as well as those who straddle the margins of the real and the unreal -- the strange, the surreal, the absurd, and the real-yet-bizarre. Writing prompts, small assignments, and reading for craft will help get juices flowing during the first few weeks. During the second half of the course, students will turn in two pieces of short fiction that employ craft tools we've developed during our first weeks. This section is ideal for students interested in writing literary, character- and language-driven non-realism or strange realism, though all types of fiction are welcome.

 

Texts:

Making Comics by Lynda Barry | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1770463690 | ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1770463691

The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1989862004

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1989862001

Roget's Thesaurus, 8th Edition | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0062843737

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0062843739

[course packet]

 

Assessment/Grading Rubric:

To excel in this class, students must complete all assignments -- there are quite a few -- and participate in good faith.

  • Attend all classes except in extenuating circumstances, participate in discussions, and write conscientiously during writing prompt sessions. 
  • Do all the readings by published authors and their classmates, providing written feedback regularly.
  • Participation includes attending all departmental reading events and one office hours appointment.
  • Write two pieces of short fiction of up to 25 pages, one of which students will revise during the course, as well as several shorter writing assignments.

 

Sathian's Wednesday section:

Engines of Story, from Autobiography to Imagination

You may have heard, at some point, the maxim that you should “write what you know.” But much great fiction is about blending autobiography or deeply personal material with leaps of imagination, i.e. venturing into what we do NOT immediately know

This is the great what if of fiction: what if you’d gone to that other high school, what if you could see your childhood through your mother’s or brother’s eyes, what if you were living in the village where your grandmother grew up – what if you were your grandmother? Choosing what will happen requires perfectly combining what we know with the right questions about what we don’t know; balancing the self and that which is beyond ourselves. How do we do so responsibly? What are the limitations of imagination or empathy? And most importantly: how can we write the stories or novels that only WE can write?

For those at the beginning of their fiction writing journeys, this class offers a way to move from raw ideas to voice, structure, narrative, plot, and story. We’ll learn how to observe, imagine, create. This section is ideal for those who want to know how to get the engines of their stories started. Writing prompts, small assignments, and reading for craft will help get juices flowing during the first few weeks. (We'll study writers like James Baldwin, Jamaica Kincaid, Lorrie Moore, Akhil Sharma, and more.) During the second half of the course, students will turn in two pieces of short fiction that employ craft tools we've developed during our first weeks.

 

Texts:

Making Comics by Lynda Barry | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1770463690 | ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1770463691

The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1989862004

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1989862001

Roget's Thesaurus, 8th Edition | ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0062843737

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0062843739

[course packet]

 

Assessment/Grading Rubric:

To excel in this class, students must complete all assignments -- there are quite a few -- and participate in good faith.

  • Attend all classes except in extenuating circumstances, participate in discussions, and write conscientiously during writing prompt sessions. 
  • Do all the readings by published authors and their classmates, providing written feedback regularly.
  • Participation includes attending all departmental reading events and one office hours appointment.
  • Write two pieces of short fiction of up to 25 pages, one of which students will revise during the course, as well as several shorter writing assignments.

 

Yanique's section:

Content:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing.  We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, narrative control, dialogue, scene development, setting, structure, openings and endings.  We will engage with fiction writing as always about creating human beings with histories, bodies, and social realities; as always about creating a world anew for an audience; and always a form of communication with an ongoing humanity—be it dead writers, current beloveds, future anonymous readers or one’s own self. Students will come to understand the fiction workshop as a place to face fears, biases and the limitations of the imagination all via practice and hard work.  Students will come to see fiction writing as a place to engage bravely and vulnerably with grief, joy and the full range of human emotions between. Students should budget for printing/photocopying.

 

Texts:

Telling Tales, Nadine Gordimer, ed.

Annie John, Jamaica Kincaid

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance

Written comments to fellow students

Writing Exercises

Class Participation

3 pieces of fiction/2 new pieces and one revision (3-20 pgs each)

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Intermediate Fiction Writing (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W)
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 10-15 pages of fiction
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  staff                 Tuesday 8-11am    CANCELLED

ENGCW 370RW-2  Houck               Wednesday 2:30-5:30  

ENGCW 370RW-3  Skibell              Thursday 2:30-5:30 

 

Houck's section:

Content:

Intermediate Fiction Writing is a workshop studio course focused on the craft and development of short, literary fiction. Students will read short stories published by a diverse set of innovative contemporary authors weekly, and be asked to produce at least two original stories for peer review and assessment. Other coursework includes short exercises and craft-focused analysis. Our course theme will be on the relationship between form and meaning in fiction – thus we will read and practice structurally innovative short stories. Students are expected to be present and engaged in class discussion, to incorporate acquired skills and concepts into their writing, and to participate an active literary community of their peers.

 

Texts:

Required:

  • One (1) edition of The Best American Short Stories anthology – specific editions will be individually assigned to students after the initial class; students will purchase their specific edition (ranging between 2005 and 2021, respectively) and read it asynchronously during the semester in support of a short analysis essay.
  • Weekly readings and handouts from the instructor

 

**Non-required texts:  

  • The Half-Known World: On Writing Fiction, Robert Boswell, Graywolf Press 2008
  • Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed., Penguin 2006
  • The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers, John Gardner, Vintage Books 1991
  • Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft and Form, Madison Smart Bell, W. W. Norton 1997
  • Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction (Expanded Edition), Charles Baxter, Graywolf Press 2008
  • The Elements of Style (Third Edition), William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White, Allyn & Bacon 1995

**Non-required texts offer writing resources outside the classroom, and source many of the concepts we engage with during the semester

 

Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the year, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and selected revisions. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

*Note: Final work will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and in terms of its potential. Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

 

Skibell's section:

Content:

This workshop will explore the art and craft of fiction writing. We will explore the essential elements of storytelling — character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, scene construction — and how each is used in short fiction. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's work-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short stories as well as technical consideration of technique, character development, and narrative structure, along with two revisions. Classes will be conducted as synchronous workshops/roundtable discussion in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work.

 

Texts:

Each participant will contribute a published story to the discussion. This will be our text.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW: Intermediate Poetry Writing (two sections) MAX: 15 students each section

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W) 
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 3-4 poems, each poem on a separate page
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

 

Sections:

ENGCW 371RW-1  Marshall                   Wednesday 2:30-5:30  

ENGCW 371RW-2  Christle                    Thursday 2:30-5:30  

 

Marshall's section:

Content:

In this intermediate American poetry course, we will focus on the creation of rigorous, impactful, original poems as well critical reading and writing about poetry and poetics. 

The required reading, writing, podcasts, and exercises are designed to help you increase you understanding of the forms and uses of poetry.

In addition to reading published works broadly and deeply, we will read one another's writing closely, and through our conversations we will develop a vocabulary with which to name and describe the critical development of one another’s work over time. We’ll use that vocabulary to discuss the effects of the craft choices poets outside of our room have made in their poems. 

Often, we will ground our discussions in various ecologies and systems that impact dominant practices in poetics; these include the climate and social inequity. Each of you will be responsible for creating discussion questions for and leading at least one class discussion. You will also be required to attend two live literature events. 

Among the things we can expect of one another in our class: bravery, honesty, and relevance; we will read broadly and from the world outside of campus; complete assigned readings and come to class prepared; we will provide respectful feedback to our peers; and we will listen responsibly and receive feedback gracefully.

Students should budget for photocopying and printing.

NOTE: Students MUST attend the first class session or you will not be permitted to take this class.

 

Texts

  • Throwing the Crown Jacob Saenz
  • Floaters by Martín Espada
  • Anybody by Ari Banias
  • Forest Primeval Vievee Francis
  • a single-author poetry collection of your own choosing

*additional texts will be posted to Canvas. You are responsible for printing them and bringing them to class.

 

Subscribe to

  • Vs Podcast
  • The Slowdown

 

Assessment

  • Craft essay 10%
  • Portfolio of original, revised poems 40%
  • Vigorous Participation 20%
  • Presentations 10%
  • Workshop discussion 10%
  • Book Review 5%
  • Recitation 5%

 

Christle's section:

Content:

An intermediate, intensive workshop in which you will read, discuss, create, revise, and otherwise experience an abundance of poetry. We will seek, in our meetings, to make connections between the language and ideas of poetry and those of the worlds we inhabit. Together we will develop and expand a shared vocabulary in which poems can be made, read, understood, furthered, and enjoyed. In addition to writing a new poem each week, you will read five poetry collections, and you will draw upon our discussion of the work to create a structured imitation poem assignment. A portfolio of revised work, including a brief introduction, will be handed in at the semester’s end.

 

Texts:

TBA  

 

Assessment:

Weekly poems (15%)

Class participation (20%)

Individual conferences and attendance at CW events (10%)

Imitation poem assignment (15%)

Your final portfolio of revised poems (30%)

Your introductory essay (10%)

ENGCW/THEA 372RW Playwriting

ENGCW/THEA 372RW: Intermediate Playwriting  (two sections)

MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10, THEA: 5) each section

Pre-requisite: None

APPLICATION INFORMATION FOR BOTH SECTIONS:

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications may be downloaded from the "Course Application" tab on the left (https://creativewriting.emory.edu/academics/Course%20Application.html) or obtained by emailing Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu.

Writing sample requirement: 3-5 pages of a script, poems, or prose. Excerpts from larger work is acceptable. Please include your sample with your application in ONE Word document.

Extracurricular Activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend and write short responses about selected readings sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, as well as productions by Theater Emory and/or in the greater Atlanta community.

 

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-1   Tabaque       Monday 2:30-5:30  

ENGCW/THEA 372RW-2   Belflower      Thursday  2:30-5:30  

 

Tabaque’s section:

NOTE: Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or you will not be permitted to take this class.

 

Content:

An introduction to the craft and art of playwriting.  This course will culminate in composition and group workshop of an original one act play (20-30 pages), using exercises in shorter form compositions and reading and play analysis to support the culminating text along the way. Students will also build practices in targeted feedback synthesis and written reflection on the creative process. 

 

Texts:

Readings will be made available on Canvas.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their demonstrated understanding of playwriting craft, ability to write with clarity and artistry, and ability and willingness to give and receive targeted feedback. Highest grades will be given to students who make extraordinary progress in their playwriting over the course of the semester, approach their analytical assignments with the same rigor and creativity as their writing exercises, and participate generously in giving feedback to other writers. Students who need substantial correction either in the shaping of a play, the meeting of class deadlines, or feedback given to other writers will receive lower grades. Failing grades will be given to students who fail to meet substantial class objectives.

 

Belflower's section:

TBA

ENGCW 373RW Advanced Fiction

ENGCW 373RW-1: Advanced Fiction Writing     MAX: 15 students  

Jones    Tuesday 2:30-5:30

 

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: An A or A- in ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction Writing 
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 10-15 pages of fiction
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

 

TBA

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction Writing    MAX: 15 students

Skibell   Wednesday 2:30-5:30  

 

Content:

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing personal nonfiction narratives. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling -- character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, etc. -- and how each is used in creating a story out of the events of one’s own life. Students will learn how to turn a true story into a written narrative. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of one another’s works-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short nonfiction pieces as well as considerations of technique, creation of real characters, and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, and short lectures, with some in-class writing and improvisation.

Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop, attach a 10-15 page prose writing sample to your application

 

Texts:

My Father’s Guitar & Other Imaginary Things, Joseph Skibell

A PDF compendium of stories

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW/FILM 378RW: Screenwriting

ENGCW 378RW-1/FILM 378RW-2: Screenwriting      MAX: 15 (ENGCW: 10, FILM: 5)  

Williams    Wednesday  2:30-5:30

 

APPLICATION INFORMATION:

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film and Media Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications may be downloaded from the "Course Application" tab on the left (https://creativewriting.emory.edu/academics/Course%20Application.html) or obtained by emailing Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu.

Writing samples are not required for application to ENGCW 378RW-1/FILM 378RW-2.

Screenwriting sections taught by Professor Joe Conway do not require an application.

PRE-REQUISITE - Screenwriting applicants must have taken one of these classes:

  • ENGCW 270W Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing
  • ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing
  • FILM 101 Introduction to Film (formerly FILM 270)


TBA

ENGCW 385RW/AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases

ENGCW 385RW-1: Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases     

(Crosslisted with AAS/AMST/HIST 387RW-1)     MAX: 16 (4 each subject)  

Klibanoff        Tuesday 2:30-5:15 

 

Content: 

In the years between 1945 and 1968, untold numbers of American citizens were targeted for death because of their race, beliefs, or civil rights work – and in some cases merely because of what they drove, how they spoke, or the ever-shifting lines of racial etiquette they crossed. In many cases, their murders were inadequately investigated or prosecuted, their stories left untold, and the crimes against their humanity never punished. The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project at Emory University is both a class and an ongoing historical and journalistic exploration of the Jim Crow South through the prism of unsolved or unpunished civil rights-era murders in Georgia. Using primary evidence – including FBI records, NAACP files, old newspaper clippings, court transcripts, and personal archives – students come to see and understand history from the inside out. Student essays, grounded in secondary readings that provide broader context, will be aimed at the project website, coldcases.emory.edu. Students also may become engaged in the fourth season of a podcast, Buried Truths, based on a case we’ll be examining in class.

Students should budget for photocopying.

 

NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students. All students, including students from African American Studies, American Studies, and History, must fill out and submit the application form in Word format and include a writing sample of 3 pages, nonfiction preferred.

 

Texts:

Course packet handed out in class

 

Assessment:

There will be frequent writing assignments and frequent requests to revise your work. I will read your work closely, make comments on your theme, your structure, your language, word selection, grammar, punctuation, spelling and citations, as well as your integration of primary evidence and secondary material. You may work on a team project, may be tasked to help with the podcast Buried Truths, and will write an 8- to 10-page final paper. I will build in time for peer review of your work. I will meet with you out of class to focus on both the research and the writing. You will see that I am as serious about your mastery of writing as I am of your command of the historical events we will examine. My goal is not merely for you to learn and understand the history, but to be able to convey it clearly. 

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW 389W Special Topics: Linked Stories

ENGCW 389W-1 Special Topics            MAX: 15 students

Linked Stories: Reading and Writing Connected Stories or Novels-in-stories    

Yanique    Tuesday 2:30-5:30

 

NOTE REGARDING APPLICATION TO THIS COURSE:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W), preferably Intro to Fiction Writing (272W)
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 1 complete, polished short story or novel chapter (no minimum page requirement)
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE DOCUMENT with writing sample attached

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program. 

NOTE: Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or you will not be permitted to take this class.

 

Content:

This class is a study and practice on the form of stand-alone stories that have common elements such as space, kinship, time, character or other elements of craft and content, in order to connect the narratives within a story collection or a novel. We will read book length examples of this form. Students will write three or more linked stand-alone narratives.

 

Texts:

A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

Women of Brewster Place by Gloria Naylor

Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance

Written comments to fellow students

Writing Exercises

Class Participation

3 pieces of linked fiction (3-25 pages)

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted Honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by Honors thesis director.

Please review Honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html