Spring 2022 Course Atlas

Permission is required to enroll in all Creative Writing classes. A link to the application can be found in the menu on the left.

 

Applications must be submitted via email to the department administrator, Nora Lewis, at nora.lewis@emory.edu. The application must be in Word format. If a writing sample is required, the sample must be attached to the application form and submitted together as ONE document in Word format. The email subject line should be "Spring 2022 application - YOUR NAME." Failure to use this subject line may result in a delayed response.

All students, including majors and non-majors, must take one 200-level Intro (either 270, 271, or 272) before advancing to Intermediate 300-level workshops in prose or poetry. The same is required of non-majors who wish to take creative writing workshops, though some professors may choose to waive this requirement for junior and senior non-majors. The requirement is never waived for majors. Note that the 300-level workshop in Playwriting does not require any pre-requisite.

Students who have completed the 200-level requirement may apply to any Intermediate workshop.

OXFORD STUDENTS: Oxford students may apply for an ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing workshop, as that course is not taught at Oxford in Spring 2022. Oxford students who have completed a required 200-level introductory course may apply for Emory 300-level intermediate workshops.

A 300-level intermediate course is a pre-requisite for an advanced course. Students who wish to take an advanced course in fiction, poetry, or playwriting in the Spring must receive a grade of A or A- in their intermediate 300-level course.

Please see http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/major-english-creative-writing.html for more information about the Creative Writing Program requirements.

All classes are HAPW unless otherwise noted.

All classes have a maximum of 15 students unless otherwise noted.

DO NOT EMAIL AN INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION. The instructors will forward your email to Nora Lewis in the Creative Writing Program office, who will then communicate with you regarding the application process.

If you are not sure if a course is open, or have any other questions, please email Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu. ***OPUS is NOT an accurate picture of availability*** as students who have been accepted into a class may have not yet pre-registered or added in.

 

EMORY COLLEGE COURSE ATLAS: https://atlas.emory.edu/

Pre-registration Appointment Schedule: http://college.emory.edu/oue/academic-calendar.htm

ENGCW 190 Freshman Seminar

ENGCW 190: Freshman Seminar: Writing in the Garden     MAX: 15 students    GER: FSEM

Christle  Wednesday 2:30-5:30

NO APPLICATION REQUIRED

Content:

The title of this course is literal. We will frequently gather outside, and course requirements will include an hour of work each month in Emory’s Educational Gardens. (No prior experience is necessary and the nature of the work will be adaptable/accessible to all.) We will additionally welcome guest lecturers from various disciplines, attend events during Jamaica Kincaid’s visit to campus on February 10, and make excursions to sites beyond Emory to explore their gardens and histories. Throughout, students will collect language and compose observations drawn from their reading and experiences in an informal notebook, which they will make use of when completing weekly writing assignments. These assignments will periodically be shared and discussed in class, and students will be expected to offer one another insightful, generative feedback. As the semester approaches its culmination, students will each choose a short excerpt from our reading to appear in one of Emory’s garden sites, and then write an essay reflecting upon that choice.

Texts:  

Course texts will include Jamaica Kincaid’s My Garden (Book), Leslie Marmon Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes, and Cole Swensen’s Ours, as well as selected poems, essays, and stories by writers such as Karel Čapek, Ross Gay, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Andrew Marvell, George McKay, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, and Virginia Woolf, among others. 

Assessment:

Notebook: 15% 
Gardening hours: 15% 
Event attendance: 10% 
Weekly writing assignments: 20% 
In-class participation and attendance: 20% 
Final essay: 20% 

 

Pre-requisite: None

ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGCW 271W:  Introduction to Poetry Writing (three sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 271W-1  Sturm         Monday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 271W-2  Schiff          Tuesday 2:30-5:30   

ENGCW 271W-3  Marshall     Wednesday 2:30-5:30

 

Sturm's section:  

Course Description:

This class is an opportunity to generate new creative work in a collaborative, critical setting. In order to develop the relationship between creative reading practices and creative writing practices, we will read and discuss books by a number of 20th and 21st century American poets whose work will guide our discussion of poetic techniques and aesthetic practices. We will study these poets as means of exploring new aesthetic territory as well as to reflect on our own interests, intentions, and practices as writers. By reading a set of texts all published within the last six years, the aim of this course is to introduce students to the landscape of contemporary poetry and poetics while experimenting with new approaches to their own writing and thinking. We will write new poems in correspondence with the material we read, complete questionnaires to accompany each book, recite poems, create a poetics statement, discuss aesthetic processes and revision, and produce chapbooks of our own poetry.

 

Textbooks:

Pregrets by Anselm Berrigan (Black Square Editions, 2021)
Near, At by Jennifer Soong (Futurepoem, 2019)
Certain Magical Acts by Alice Notley (Penguin, 2016)
Mutiny by Phillip B. Williams (Penguin, 2021)
The Cipher by Molly Brodak (Pleiades Press, 2020)
Curb by Divya Victor (Nightboat Books, 2021)

 

Assessment:

Students’ grades will be based on timely and attentive completion of the following exercises:

Poem-Responses: 20 points each (120 total)            
Questionnaires: 20 points each (120 total)   
Workshop Participation & Discussion: 100 points    
Chapbook with revisions: 100 points

 

Extracurricular Activities:

At least one course meeting during the Spring 2022 semester will involve a class visit to the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library on the 10th floor of the Woodruff Library.

 

Schiff’s section: 

Content:

This lively poetry course will concentrate on form and play in poetry. We will look closely at both the formal attributes and the sense of play in a wide variety of poems across historic periods and in the contemporary moment to discover how the use of poetic forms—and moreover the playful breaking of forms—has shaped poetic expression over time. We will engage a number of traditional forms, as well as free verse, nonce forms, and invented procedures, to ask ourselves how form and structure can be expressive, rebellious, political, and innovative. Students will have the opportunity to imitate and undermine the structures we encounter as we wonder together how form might be reinvigorated, renovated, recycled, or even abandoned in the present day. Our conversations will inspire exercises and dares that challenge our habits and visions, and we will embrace all kinds of structural possibilities. In addition to  reading widely, we will deeply and generously respond to student work with an eye toward articulating and enhancing the relationships between deep structure and expression. Requirements include a sense of play and an open mind.

 

Books:

The Art of Description: World into Word, by Mark Doty
The Norton Anthology of Poetry. Shorter fifth Edition, edited by Ferguson, Salter, & Stallworthy
Selected Poems, by Gwendolyn Brooks
Dear Prudence, New and Selected Poems, by David Trinidad
frank: sonnets, by Diane Seuss  

Electronic course pack curated by the instructor. Please budget for voluminous printing from Canvas.

 

Grade Calculation:

30 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship
30 points: Quizzes on reading
20 points: Midterm portfolio and essay
20 points: Final portfolio and essay

 

Marshall's section:

Course Description:

Studies in poetry and poetic forms.

This class is an exploration of poetry and poetic forms. It emphasizes critical reading and writing about poetry and poetics. In our time together we will discuss the histories of poetry, try various forms in our own writing, and look at the world of contemporary poetry as it functions now. Often, we will ground our discussion in various types of ecologies and systems that impact dominant practices in poetics; these include the climate and social inequity. In addition to reading published works broadly and deeply, we will read one another's writing closely, and through our conversations we will develop a vocabulary with which to name and describe the development of one another's work. We'll use that vocabulary to discuss the effects of the choices poets outside of our room have made in their poems. One section of this course will be taught in-person once per week.

 

The Reading:

The Poet's Companion, Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux
Postcolonial Love Poem, Natalie Diaz
Look, Solmaz Sharif
Deaf Republic, Ilya Kaminsky
Fieldnotes on Ordinary Love, Keith S. Wilson
Soft Science, Franny Choi
Dispatch, Cam Awkward-Rich
Something Sinister, Hayan Charara

 

Various readings will be posted on Canvas (students should budget for printing)

 

Assessment:

Final portfolios: 50%
Craft essay: 10%
Reader Responses: 10%
Poems 10%
Vigorous class participation: 10%
Exercises/Journals: 5%
Recitations: 5%

 

Additional Requirements:

Students are required to attend two poetry readings (in person or digitally) throughout the course of the semester.

ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGCW 272W: Introduction to Fiction Writing (four sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for all sections:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

Pre-requisite: None

 

Sections:

ENGCW 272W-1  Haynes                  Monday 8:00-11:00

ENGCW 272W-2  Yanique                 Tuesday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 272W-3  Clark                      Wednesday 2:30-5:30 (remote)

ENGCW 272W-4  Corbitt                   Thursday 2:30-5:30

 

Haynes' section:

Course description: 

This introductory fiction course will focus on foundational craft techniques that include plot and character development, conflict, structure, scene development, and pacing. Through in-class writing assignments, and writing on one’s own, students will develop their fictional voice over the course of the semester. Students will also hone their craft through the analysis, and discussion, of both published stories and classmates’ writing in workshops. A fundamental aspect of this course will be the consideration of one’s life as a source of fiction. As a result, the focus will be on literary fiction; genre fiction, which includes speculative and sci-fi fiction, mystery, horror, romance, or fan fiction will not be written or workshopped. Students will produce two completed pieces of short fiction over the course of the semester. The second story will require significant revision and will be submitted at semester’s end in lieu of final exam. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should budget for photocopying. 

Required textbooks: 

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Short Stories Since 1970, 2nd ed., Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds.  
A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan, New York: Anchor Books, 2010. 
Selected stories handed out by the professor 

 

Assessment/Grading Rubric:

Story draft 1: 10% 
Midsemester portfolio (revision of first story): 20% 
Final portfolio (revision of second story): 25% 
Workshop critique of classmates’ work/participation: 10% 
Group participation: 10% 
Story draft 2: 10% 
On-time submission of work: 5% 
In-class and homework assignments: 5% 
Attending external reading presentations: 5% 


Extracurricular Activity

The Creative Writing program understands that creative writing is not limited to reading, writing, and workshop, but the interaction with other writers outside of the classroom. There are a few lectures/readings by writers this semester that students are required to attend in person.

 

Yanique's section:

Content:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing.  We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, narrative control, dialogue, scene development, setting, structure, openings and endings.  We will engage with fiction writing as always about creating human beings with histories, bodies, and social realities; as always about creating a world anew for an audience; and always a form of communication with an ongoing humanity—be it dead writers, current beloveds, future anonymous readers or one’s own self. Students will come to understand the fiction workshop as a place to face fears, biases and the limitations of the imagination all via practice and hard work.  Students will come to see fiction writing as a place to engage bravely and vulnerably with grief, joy and the full range of human emotions between. Students should budget for printing/photocopying.

 

Texts:

Telling Tales, Nadine Gordimer, ed.
Annie John, Jamaica Kincaid

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises
Class Participation
3 pieces of fiction/2 new pieces and one revision (3-20 pgs each)

 

 

Clark's section:

Content:

This is an introductory course on the art of fiction writing. This workshop provides you with a place to share your fiction, encounter the creative work of others, and offer and receive constructive criticism; it also serves as a weekly reminder that you are not alone in the sometimes solitary endeavor of writing. We will focus on elements of craft such as character development, dialogue, scene/summary, setting, and point of view. We will encounter fiction as a place to engage with the full range of human emotions through character-driven stories.

Students will begin by writing creative exercises that explore elements of craft. Students will then progress to writing complete fiction, which will be critiqued in a workshop setting and radically revised. Workshops will focus on authorial intent and help the writer see their story from the outside. To become a better writer, reading widely is essential. Students will learn to read with the eyes of a writer, examining the way published stories work and the choices the writers made. Each week, students will read and discuss in-depth one or more published stories.

Note: There will be stories I will ask you to avoid writing (“and in the end, it was all a dream...”). However, this workshop does not wholesale ban genre fiction. Bring your horror, fantasy, fairy tales, and sci-fi, but leave behind the clichés and agreed-upon rules that constrain bad, generic genre writing. The challenge of art is to make new that which has become shopworn and dull.

Text:

The Art and Craft of Fiction: A Writer's Guide, 2nd ed., Michael Kardos

Coursework Overview:

Weekly Craft Discussions (total: 12)
Weekly Writing Exercises (total: 16)
Readings: textbook, published stories, craft essays.
Workshop Critiques (total: depends on group size)
Short Story for Workshop with Artist Statement/Reflection
Revision Portfolio (Revised story and Revision letter)

 

Corbitt's section:

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the craft and study of short fiction through a process-focused approach to workshop. The semester will begin with short writing exercises from which students will identify, construct, and revise full stories. These revised drafts and a reflection on process will serve as the final exam in this course. Throughout the semester, students will also read and discuss published stories with an emphasis on fundamental craft elements, such as plot, character, dialogue, and description. This course will prepare students for intermediate-level workshops in fiction. Students should budget for photocopying.

Text:

Texts will be provided through Canvas. Students will also need a notebook of at least 100 pages.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their participation, writing, and close reading skills. Original creative work (creative journal exercises and original scenes and stories) will account for 30% of the grade. Written responses to others’ work (reading, Creative Writing Reading series, and workshop responses) also account for 30%. Class participation accounts for 20%, as does the final revised story and explanation.

 

ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Fiction (two sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Note regarding application to this course:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W)
  • Applications must include a 10-15-page fiction writing sample
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE document with writing sample included

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 370RW-1  Skibell           Monday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 370RW-2  Houck            Thursday 2:30-5:30  

 

Skibell's section:

Content:

This workshop will explore the art and craft of fiction writing. We will explore the essential elements of storytelling — character, plot, setting, structure, dialogue, scene construction — and how each is used in short fiction. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's work-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the creation of three short stories as well as technical consideration of technique, character development, and narrative structure, along with two revisions. Classes will be conducted as synchronous workshops/roundtable discussion in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work.

Texts:

Each participant will contribute a published story to the discussion. This will be our text.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each story is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

 

Houck's section:

Course Description:

Intermediate Fiction Writing is a workshop studio course focused on the craft and development of short, literary fiction. Students will read short stories published by a diverse set of innovative contemporary authors, and be asked to produce at least two original stories for peer review and assessment. Other coursework includes short exercises and craft-focused analysis. We will pay specific attention to issues of process, craft, and story-structure during the semester, experimenting with modes of non-linear and fragmented narrative. Students are expected to be present and engaged in class discussion, to incorporate acquired skills and concepts into their writing, and to participate an active literary community of their peers.

Required texts: 

One (1) edition of The Best American Short Stories anthology – specific editions will be individually assigned to students after the initial class; students will purchase their specific edition (ranging between 2005 and 2020, respectively) and read it asynchronously during the semester. 

Readings and handouts from the instructor

Non-required/Supporting texts: 

The Half-Known World: On Writing Fiction, Robert Boswell, Graywolf Press 2008
Now Write!, Later Printing Edition, Sherry Ellis, ed., Penguin 2006
The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers, John Gardner, Vintage Books 1991
Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft and Form, Madison Smart Bell, W. W. Norton 1997
Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction (Expanded Edition), Charles Baxter, Graywolf Press 2008
The Elements of Style (Third Edition), William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White, Allyn & Bacon 1995

Assessment:

Coursework will be collected in a Final Portfolio at the end of the year, which will account for the majority of a student’s grade. Portfolios will include drafts of workshopped stories and selected revisions. Participation, attendance, and analytic assignments will also be assessed.

 

*Note: Work in the final portfolio will be graded normally, but workshopped drafts will not be receiving letter grades during the semester. They will instead be given a comprehensive feedback letter from the instructor, along with a ‘Draft-Stage Evaluation’ using the Early/Middle/Late system. This system has approximate letter-grade equivalents (Early and Early-Middle = C or below, Middle = C+ to B, Middle-Late = B to B+, and Late = A- to an A), but is meant to indicate how finished a story is, on its own terms and as a draft, rather than as a completed work. Feedback in this form (along with feedback from peers) is oriented towards the re-approach, revision and fine-tuning of students’ stories, and better emulates the real-world processes of practicing authors.

ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 371RW: Creative Writing: Intermediate Poetry (two sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Note regarding application to this course:

  • Pre-requisite: Any 200-level Creative Writing workshop (ENGCW 270W, 271W, 272W)
  • Applications must include a writing sample of 3-4 poems, each on a separate page
  • Applications must be submitted in Word format as ONE document with writing sample included

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 371RW-1  Brown        Tuesday 2:30-5:30 

ENGCW 371RW-2  Franklin     Wednesday 2:30-5:30

 

 

Brown's section:

NOTE: Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or you will not be permitted to take this class.

 

Content:

The Intermediate Poetry Writing course has as its foremost feature the writing and critiquing of poems by students.  Students will make use of poetic terms and learn more about the work of major American poets.  Each student will have an opportunity to lead class in a discussion of a poet’s work.  As poetry always has, this course deals with material meant for mature audiences and adult discussion.  Students who do not wish to think or study should reconsider their enrollment in this course.  Students should budget for photocopying.

In the Intermediate Creative Writing Poetry course, students will generate new work while helping to engender in one another new ideas about writing.  As there is a profound relationship between reading poetry and writing it, we will read, discuss, and even recite the work of several poets whose example might lead us to a further honing of our craft. We will read each other's work, giving and receiving the kind of feedback that binds any community of poets.  We will also make use of writing exercises that keep our ears open and our fingers moving. 

Each student will have at least four poems workshopped.  In each workshop, we will read and discuss students’ poems in order to examine the relationships between the poet's intentions and ideas and the phrases and images used to embody them.  Students will also write two personal essays discussing their poetics.     

Students are expected to attend class having read all required material and prepared to discuss individual responses to the readings.  While students may like or dislike a piece, their responsibility is to examine its language and infer what emotions the poet means for the language to incite.    

 

Texts:

Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, Michael Dumanis and Cate Marvin, eds. 
Contemporary American Poetry, 7th ed., A. Poulin and Michael Waters, eds. 
frank: sonnets, Diane Seuss

 

Assessment:

Essay on personal poetics I:           5%
Invocation (recitation of at least seven lines of a poem): 5%
Presentation/Review:                    15%
Presentation Discussion:               20%
Workshop Participation:                20%
Workshop Discussion:                   20%
Revisions:                                     5%
Essay on personal poetics II:        10%

 

Franklin's section:

Content and Assessment:

Please Come Celebrate with Me: The Art of the Poetic Line in Contemporary African American Poetry”

This course explores a wide range of topics pertaining to the African American experience in the fields of human and civil rights, and social and literary texts of poetry by contemporary African American poets. Course requirements include a standard book review of a collection of poems by a (living) contemporary African American poet, analytical responses, a portfolio of students’ original poetry, how to write a cover letter/query for a poetry publication in a journal, 500-word reflections on live poetry readings, revision & workshop, group projects and oral presentations. 60% of the course grading is dedicated to writing poems each week (attendance is a priority) and the revision of said poems, and 40% of course grading is for the beforementioned assignments. 

 

Required Textbook:

Angles of Ascent: a Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry, Ed. Charles Henry Rowell

 

ENGCW 373RW Advanced Fiction

ENGCW 373RW: Creative Writing: Advanced Fiction (two sections) MAX: 15 students (each section)

Extracurricular activities for both sections:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

Sections:

ENGCW 373RW-1  Plattner     Monday 2:30-5:30

ENGCW 373RW-2  Cooper      Wednesday 2:30-5:30

 

Plattner's section:

Note regarding application to this course:

  • Pre-requisite: ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction
  • Writing sample of recent fiction (minimum 5 pages, double-spaced) submitted with the application in ONE Word document

Course Description & Objectives:

Advanced Fiction will require each student to write two original works of short fiction between 12-20 pages (suggested). Each student story will be workshopped by the class; for the final exam, one of these stories will be revised by the student.

Twice during the term, each student will also be assigned as the primary respondent for the workshop discussion. The primary respondent is responsible for anchoring the class discussion and providing a detailed review of the story.

Also:

* We will devote at least one week of workshop to flash fiction.
* Each student is to keep a workshop journal; the entries will be assigned periodically.
* There will be two read-and-response short writing assignments.

Hopefully through this work, a student’s understanding of the art of fiction writing will be enhanced.

Texts:

None

Assessment:

Final grades for this class will be calibrated this way:
Short Story (2)                                         10 pts each
Primary Respondent Duties (2)                   10 pts each
Peer Review Grades                                   20 pts (two 10 pt. assessments)
Short Writing Projects                                10pts (two 5 pt. assessments)
Workshop Journal                                      10pts
Flash Fiction                                              10 pts
Final Exam, Revision of Short Story #1:       10 pts   
                                                                _____________
                                                                100 pts

Grade Structure

93+                    A
90-92                 A-
87-89                 B+
84-86                 B
81-83                 B-
78-80                 C+
75-77                 C
72-74                 C-
69-71                 D+
60-68                 D
59-                     F

 

Cooper's section:

Notes regarding application to this course:

  1. Pre-requisite: ENGCW 370RW Intermediate Fiction (with a final grade of A- or A)
  2. A writing sample of 3-5 pages of fiction is required if English is not your first language.
  3. In some circumstances, students will be asked to submit a writing sample in addition to their application.

 

Content:

An intensive workshop in the writing and reading/critiquing of short literary fiction.* Student writing will be centered, but we will also explore relevant published work. Over the semester, students will write and workshop two original short stories. Students will revise these stories for their final Portfolio (which will serve as the final exam, and will include additional elements of writing/analysis related to the art of fiction writing). Students will also read and respond to weekly student and published work (both written and oral feedback), as well as lead workshop discussions. Significant class participation will be expected in this course, which is designed for serious writing students with a working knowledge of fiction and familiarity with the various elements of craft—and who have participated in regular fiction writing workshops (or the equivalent, including fiction written on your own, or in other academic settings). Students should come to the first class ready to work hard, take risks, be vulnerable—and start always from a place of seeking to improve both their own and their classmates’ writing. Students should also come to the first class prepared to submit their first workshop story by the following week of class. (Note: You must attend the first class in order to take this course.)

*We will not write or explore genre work in this course (fantasy, sci-fi, horror, romance, mystery, etc.)

 

Text:

There is no set text for this course. Students should budget for a substantial amount of (required) photocopying and/or printing. 

 

Extracurricular Activities:

Students are required to attend all readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program (outside of class time).

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their ability to write clearly and with proper grammar, the shaping of narrative prose, and the logic and artistry of their story choices. Highest grades will be given to writers whose work is without need of major overhaul or who make extraordinary progress in their writing over the course of the semester. Writers who need substantial correction either in the use of language, the shaping of a story, the logic of a story, or the meeting of class deadlines  and requirements will receive lower grades. Avid, frequent class participation is required 100% of the time.

Grade breakdown: 70% of the final grade will come from students' creative/written work (20% for each of two short stories presented in workshop; 30% for the final revisions and portfolio), while 30% will come from class participation (15% for feedback on peer work; 10% Participation/Attendance; 5% for Reading Series attendance/responses).

ENGCW 374RW Advanced Poetry

ENGCW 374RW: Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry     MAX: 15 students 

Pre-requisite: ENGCW 371RW Intermediate Poetry

ENGCW 374RW-1  Schiff      Wednesday 2:30-5:30

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities sponsored by the Program.

 

WRITING SAMPLE REQUIRED: Attach 3-4 poems (each on its own page) to application and submit as ONE WORD DOCUMENT.

NOTE: Students (including students on the waiting list) MUST attend the first class session or you will not be permitted to take this class.

 

Content:

The goal of this intensive advanced poetry workshop seminar is to create and revise new poetry while becoming further engaged in contemporary poetics—as writers, readers, and lively participants in a thriving literary community. As we ponder what makes our poems urgent, ambitious, and accomplished in the 21st century, we will study how the poets of the past have shaped literary community through their efforts as generous literary citizens who edit, mentor, and make space for other poets. This is a course about how friendship, cooperation, and generosity have sustained the art of poetry over time, and in addition to our goal of becoming more excellent poets, we will actively work toward being generous literary citizens whose dedication to artistry includes the support of other poets. This is a course for poets with experience and ambition who are hoping to sustain the thrill of their craft and the fulfillment of community far beyond graduation.

 

Texts:

A Portrait of the Self as Nation: New and Selected Poems, Marilyn Chin
Blacks, Gwendolyn Brooks
The Complete Poems: 1927-1979, Elizabeth Bishop
Collected Poems, James Schuyler
The Collected Poems of Audre Lorde, Audre Lorde
frank: sonnets, Diane Seuss

 

Grade Calculation:

20 points: Class participation & classroom citizenship 
20 points: Quizzes on reading
20 points: Midterm portfolio and essay
20 points: Final portfolio and essay
20 points: Literary community project

 

ENGCW/THEA 375RW Advanced Playwriting

ENGCW/THEA 375RW-1: Creative Writing: Advanced Playwriting (Drama)

Skibell   Wednesday 2:30-5:30

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 10/THEA: 5)

Pre-requisite: ENGCW/THEA 372RW Intermediate Playwriting

Writing sample required: 10 pages of dramatic writing 

Content:

In a round-table setting, students will workshop their own work, critique their fellows' work, and delve into the art of playwriting and dramatic narrative, while reading and acting in each other's scenes, and reading published work. Writing and reading intensive.

NOTE: This is a permission-only course and all students, including Theater Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program (application available on the website or by emailing nora.lewis@emory.edu).

 

Texts:

Each participant will contribute a published play to read for discussion. This will be our text.

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their performance based on a 100-point system. Class attendance makes up 26 points. Peer responses equal 28. Each writing submission is worth 10 points, and proof of attendance at a remote Creative Writing Reading Series event or another literary event is worth 2.5 points each. The other 11 points is the professor’s evaluation of the student’s writing and critical reading skills.

ENGCW 376RW Creative Nonfiction

ENGCW 376RW-1: Creative Nonfiction: Nonfiction Magazine and Long-form Writing

MAX: 15 students

Klibanoff     Tuesday 2:30-5:30

NOTE: Students must have taken ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing OR they must provide some evidence they have done journalistic writing and attach a writing sample of 10-15 pages of prose or journalistic writing to their application. This course is not open to freshmen.

 

Content:

This workshop is focused on long form, nonfiction magazine and feature writing -- reading it, reporting it, writing it, and doing so in ways and by means that separate the exceptional from the pedestrian. This is nonfiction. Be prepared to be a reporter, to meet people face-to-face, to ask questions, to see and hear things with your own eyes and ears. We’ll have visiting experts on hand as we discuss where great ideas come from, how to be strategic in your reporting, the art of the interview, and crafting stories, then stories within stories. We're looking mostly at print, but we will see beyond the dead tree media at the growing opportunities for magazine-style writing and long-form narratives online. Ultimately, the goal of the course is for you to become a considerably wiser and more effective nonfiction story-teller, for which the basis is sound reporting. Students should budget for photocopying.

 

Textbook:

Storycraft: The Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfiction, Jack Hart (2nd edition)

 

Assessment:

This course in magazine and feature writing requires students to report, report and report (which means interviewing people, conducting research, observing people, situations) and to write complete stories in a narrative, journalistic style that meets high standards for clarity, accuracy, story-telling and ethics. Students will be assessed primarily on their engagement in effective, ethical reporting (gathering of information) for magazine and feature stories, and on the overall development of their reporting skills; on the development of their narrative writing as they seek the ultimate goal: to produce publishable work; on class participation, and on the quality of their responses to assignments.

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend on-campus readings and colloquia sponsored by the Creative Writing Program outside of class time.

ENGCW/FILM 378RW: Screenwriting

ENGCW/FILM 378RW-1: Screenwriting      MAX: 16 students (ENGCW: 11/FILM: 5)

Lucker   Wednesday 2:30-5:30

This is a permission-only course and all students, including Film and Media Studies students, must apply through the Creative Writing Program. Applications may be downloaded from the website or obtained by emailing Nora Lewis at nora.lewis@emory.edu.

Note: Screenwriting section 2 and Advanced Screenwriting 379RW-1 are taught by Professor Conway of Film and Media Studies. No Creative Writing application required.

PRE-REQUISITE: Screenwriting applicants must have taken one of these classes:
 
ENGCW 270W Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGCW 271W Introduction to Poetry Writing
ENGCW 272W Introduction to Fiction Writing
FILM 101 Introduction to Film (formerly FILM 270)

 

Welcome to screenwriting! This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of writing for film. We will explore the basic elements of storytelling --concept, character, plot, setting, structure, scene design, action, dialogue, etc. --and how each is used in writing for the screen. Students will learn the various formats used for film scripts. Editing skills will be sharpened in discussion and evaluation of each other's work-in-progress. The course will concentrate on the development and writing of one 30-page screenplay as well as technical consideration of technique, character and dramatic structure. Classes will be conducted as workshops in which the main emphasis is on the students' own work, with also in-class lecture, film clip review, group writing exercises and open discussion. Students should budget for Netflix and Amazon. 

 

Texts:

Crash! Boom! Bang! How to Write Action Movies, Michael Lucker
Elements of Style for Screenwriters, Paul Argentini

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their writing skills and class participation:

30% Development of screenplay (concept, character, outline)
30% Writing first draft (treatment, presentation, coverage)
30% Delivery of final draft (completed 25-page screenplay)
10% Class participation (attendance, discussion, critiquing)

 

Extracurricular activities:

Students are required to attend Creative Writing Program readings and colloquia outside of class time and are encouraged to attend any other activities co-sponsored by the Program.

ENGCW 389W/AAS/LACS 385W Special Topics: Caribbean Literature

ENGCW 389W-1: Special Topics: Caribbean Literature & Creative Writing:
A Practicum of Fiction and Poetic Forms that Primarily Consider Black and Brown Bodies

Crosslisted with AAS 385W-1 and LACS 385W-1

Yanique   Thursday 2:30-5:30

MAX: 11 students (ENGCW: 5/AAS: 3/LACS: 3)

No pre-requisites

 

Content:

This is a creative writing course that challenges Western and other traditionally received forms and methods of writing fiction and poetry and asks if and how these forms have served in writing characters of color or characters from the non-Western world.  The class will explore and practice Western forms but will give greater attention to exploring a wider sample of practices for making character, scene, and plot.  Our primary written models will come from Caribbean literature, but students will be allowed and encouraged to explore and invent forms that come from other parts of the world, other immigrant communities, other marginalized communities or from their own imaginations and lived experiences.  The course methodology will be that of lecture, class discussion based on close reading, student presentation, and in-class workshop.  Students will write poetry and fiction.  Students will be required to write a craft paper on a particular form—chosen by the student and approved by the instructor. 

 

Texts:

These Ghosts Are Family, Maisy Card
Libertie, Kaitlyn Greenidge

 

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on five elements of the course, as listed below. Each aspect of the class will be weighed equally at 20%. Students must perform with excellence on all elements of the course to receive an A-. Excellence is defined by the professor. Students performing very well will receive a grade on the B to B+ scale. Students performing well will receive a grade on the C+ to B- scale. Students performing mediocrely will receive a grade on the D to C scale. Students performing inadequately will be asked to leave the class or they will receive an F grade. The A grade is reserved for students who exceed the professor’s expectations.

Attendance
Written comments to fellow students
Writing Exercises
Class Participation
3 pieces of fiction/2 new pieces and one revision (3-20 pgs each)

ENGCW 389W/FILM/THEA 385W Special Topics: Introduction to Dramatic Writing

ENGCW 389W-2: Special Topics: Introduction to Dramatic Writing 

Crosslisted with FILM 385W-2 and THEA 385W-1

Tabaque    Tuesday 2:30-5:30

MAX: 15 students (ENGCW: 5/FILM: 5/THEA: 5)

**This counts as a 300-level workshop instead of an Introduction class.**

  

Content:

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of dramatic writing for the stage and screen. We will examine the different dynamics at play when writing for bodies in performance through analysis of contemporary screenplays, theater texts, and virtual media. We will focus on composition, workshop, and production of original short form pieces to be supplemented by analytical discussion and written reflection on contemporary writers like Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Dominique Morisseau, Janicza Bravo, and Miranda July among others. Attendance to department readings, performances, and film screenings outside of class meetings will be required.

Texts:

No required text. Readings will be made available on Canvas and will consist of a selection of plays, teleplays, and short film scripts from a variety of working writers.

Assessment:

Students will be assessed on their demonstrated understanding of dramatic technique, ability to write with intention and artistry, and willingness to give and receive targeted feedback. Highest grades will be given to students who make extraordinary progress in their composition over the course of the semester, approach their analytical assignments with the same rigor and creativity as their writing exercises, and participate generously in group discussion. Students who need substantial correction either in the shaping of dramatic work, the meeting of class deadlines, or feedback given to other writers will receive lower grades.  

ENGCW 495RW Honors

ENGCW 495RW Honors

Permission required: Accepted honors students only.

Pre-requisite: Approval of project by honors thesis director.

Please review honors application guidelines at http://creativewriting.emory.edu/home/academics/honors-program.html